Found 27 talks width keyword stellar populations

Video
Tuesday April 23, 2013
Dr. Ignacio Trujillo
IAC

Abstract

Taking advantage of the ultra-deep near-infrared imaging obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope on the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, we detect and explore for the first time the properties of the stellar haloes of two Milky Way-like galaxies at z~1. We find that the structural properties of those haloes (size and shape) are similar to the ones found in the local universe. However, these high-z stellar haloes are approximately three magnitudes brighter and exhibit bluer colours ((g-r)<0.3 mag) than their local counterparts. The stellar populations of z~1 stellar haloes are compatible with having ages <1 Gyr. This implies that the stars in those haloes were formed basically at 1<z<2. This result matches very well the theoretical predictions that locate most of the formation of the stellar haloes at those early epochs. A pure passive evolutionary scenario, where the stellar populations of our high-z haloes simply fade to match the stellar halo properties found in the local universe, is consistent with our data.


Video
Thursday January 31, 2013
Dr. Santi Cassisi
INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo

Abstract

In recent years accurate photometric and spectroscopic observations have
provided sound evidence that Galactic Globular Clusters can not be longer
considered the prototype of Simple Stellar Populations. In this talk we
present the most recent updates concerning the empirical evidence and
discuss the theoretical framework required for interpreting observations.
Current shortcomings in the interpretation of how the multiple stellar
populations formed in a given cluster are also discussed.


Video
Tuesday November 6, 2012
Dr. Matteo Monelli, Dr. Antonio Milone
IAC

Abstract

The classical idea that globular clusters are the prototypes of simple stellar populations has been revolutionized in the last few years. Multiple sequences of stars have been detected in the colour-magnitude diagram of a number of clusters, mostly thanks to high-precision HST photometry, and the correlation with the chemical properties of different generations of stars has been demonstrated. In this talk, we will first present a summary of the observational picture, and we will then introduce the SUMO project (a SUrvey of Multiple pOpulations). This is a long-term project, lead here at the IAC and aimed at detecting and characterizing multiple populations in a large sample of globular clusters. We will review the scope, the observing and reduction strategy, and the first results. So far, data for more than 30 clusters have been secured, using the wide field imagers available at the 2.2m ESO/MPI and INT telescope, thus covering both hemispheres. We will present a new photometric index which turned out to be very effective in detecting multiple RGBs in nearly all the clusters analyzed so far. The connection with the chemical content of the different populations will be also discussed.


Video
Thursday October 18, 2012
Dr. Miguel Cerviño
IAA

Abstract

The basis of stellar population modeling was established around 40 years ago somehow
optimized to the technical facilities and observational data available at that epoch. Since then,
it has been used extensively in astronomy and there has been great improvements relating
their associated ingredients in concordance with the development of more powerful computational
and observational facilities.
However, there has been no similar improvements in the understanding about what is
actually modeling neither in improve the modeling itself to include the current technical advances
to obtain more accurate result in the physical inferences obtained from them.
In this talk I present some advances in the subject of stellar
population modeling and how to take advantage of current facilities to obtain more robust
and accurate inferences from stellar systems at different scales
covering the continuum between fully resolved populations to fully unresolved ones in a unified framework.


Video
Tuesday February 14, 2012
Dr. Carsten Weidner
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

Over the past years observations of young and populous star clusters have shown that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) can be conveniently described by a two-part power-law with an exponent alpha2 = 2.3 for stars more massive than about 0.5 Msol and an exponent of alpha1 = 1.3 for less massive stars. A consensus has also emerged that most, if not all, stars form in stellar groups and star clusters, and that the mass function of these can be described as a power-law (the embedded cluster mass function, ECMF) with an exponent beta ~2. These two results imply that the integrated galactic IMF (IGIMF) for early-type stars cannot be a Salpeter power-law, but that they must have a steeper exponent. An application to star-burst galaxies shows that the IGIMF can become top-heavy. This has important consequences for the distribution of stellar remnants and for the chemo-dynamical and photometric evolution of galaxies.


Video
Thursday July 14, 2011
Dr. Anna Pasquali
Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Heidelberg, Germany

Abstract

It has been thirty years since the seminal work of Alan Dressler on the density-morphology relation, which established environment as a driving mechanism for galaxy formation and evolution. In the following three decades, we have learned that both the intrinsic processes (nature) and environment (nurture) contribute towards shaping the galaxy populations, and the connection between these two still remains an open question. I will summarize recent results on the interplay between environment and galaxy evolution, obtained from the SDSS DR4 galaxy groups catalogue (Yang et al. 2007) by comparing the properties of central and satellite galaxies as a function of their stellar mass and the dark matter mass of their
host halos.


Video
Friday June 17, 2011
Dr. Mauro D'Onofrio
University of Padova, Italy

Abstract

We present the K band FP of the ETGs members of the clusters observed by the WINGS survey. The data confirm a different tilt of the FP with respect to the V solution and the presence of a substantial tilt in the K band. This led us to further investigate the hypothesis that ETG non-homology greatly contribute to the tilt of the FP.

The WINGS data show that there are now several evidence of both structural and dynamical non-homology for the class of ETGs. Among these we will discuss in detail the tight relation between the mass of the ETGs, their stellar mass-to-light ratio M/L, and the Sersic index n describing the shape of their light profiles. We guess through a series of mock simulations that this relation acts as a fine-tuning that keeps small the scatter around the FP. We therefore conclude that ETG non-homology is closely connected either with the problem of the tilt and with the small scatter around the FP.


Video
Thursday May 12, 2011
Miss Sofia Meneses-Goytia
Kapteyn Instituut, Rijkuniversiteit Groningen, the Netherlands

Abstract

The present work shows the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) in the near-infrared using the IRTF stellar library obtained using the models based on the Single Stellar population Models (SSP) from Vazdekis et al. (1996 - 2010) which work in the optical, and use the CaT and MILES stellar libraries. In this near-infrared research, the isochrones of Marigo et al. (2008) were chosen and which have a range of metallicity [Fe/H] between -2.27 and 0.019, and ages up to 15.85 Gy. Also, they provide the corresponding ?uxes in the IR bands I to M (0.7 to 5.0 microns). The IRTF stellar library contains spectra of 292 stars (F, G, K and M stars) at a resolution of 2000, between 0.8 to 5.2 microns. The features of the SED (spectrum obtained by the integration of the spectra of the stars, at constant metallicity and age) are analysed by comparing to those found on Ivanov et al. (2004) for the IR range. In addition, t he comparison of the models with galaxy observations of early type galaxies by Marmol-Queralto et al. (2009) are presented.


Video
Thursday July 22, 2010
Dr. Sebastian F. Sánchez Sánchez
Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán de Calar Alto, Spain

Abstract

CALIFA is the largest IFS survey ever performed up to date. Recently started, it will observe ~600 galaxies in the Local Universe with PPAK at the 3.5m of the Calar Alto Observatory, sampling most of the size of these galaxies and covering the optical wavelength range between 3700-7100 Å, using to spectroscopic setups. The main goal of this survey is to characterize the spatially resolved spectroscopic properties (both the stellar and ionized gas components) of all the population of galaxies at the current cosmological time, in order to understand in detail the how is the final product of the evolution of galaxies. To do so, the sample will cover all the possible galaxies within the color-magnitude diagram, down to MB ~ -18 mag, from big dry early-types to active fainter late-type galaxies. The main science drivers of the survey is to understand how galaxies evolve within the CM-diagram, understanding the details the process of star formation, metal enrichment, migrations and morphological evolution of galaxies.


Video
Tuesday May 11, 2010
Drs. Alexandre Vazdekis; Elena Ricciardelli; Jesús Falcón Barroso
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

We present the new stellar population synthesis models based on the empirical stellar spectral library MILES, which can be regarded nowadays as standard in the field of stellar population studies. The synthetic SEDs cover the whole optical range at resolution 2.3 Å (FWHM). The unprecedented stellar parameter coverage of MILES allowed us to extend our model predictions from intermediate- to very-old age regimes, and the metallicity coverage from super-solar to [M/H] = -2.3. Observed spectra can be studied by means of full spectrum fitting or line-strengths. For the latter we propose a new Line Index System (LIS) to avoid the intrinsic uncertainties associated with the popular Lick/IDS system and provide more appropriate, uniform, spectral resolution. We present a web-page with a suite of on-line tools to facilitate the handling and transformation of the spectra. Online examples with practical applications to work with stellar spectra for a variety of instrumental setups will be shown. Furthermore we will also show examples of how to compute spectra and colors with varying instrumental setup, redshift and velocity dispersion for a suite of Star Formation Histories.


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