Found 28 talks width keyword stellar populations

Video
Tuesday January 23, 2018
Dr. Kris Youakim
Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP)

Abstract

The most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy are relics from the first generations of star formation, and their properties can reveal key information about the formation and evolution of the Milky Way. However, only a small number of these extremely rare stars are currently known, due to the difficulty in finding them amongst the overwhelmingly more abundant stars of higher metallicity. In this talk, I will present the Pristine survey, a narrow-band photometric survey in the wavelength region around the Ca H&K absorption lines designed to efficiently search for extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. In the first three years of the survey, we have covered ~2,500 square degrees of sky in the Northern hemisphere using the CFHT on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, as well as a sizeable spectroscopic follow-up sample using mostly the INT and WHT in La Palma. With this data, we have demonstrated success rates of 70% for finding stars with [Fe/H] < -2.5, and 22% for stars with [Fe/H] < -3.0. This represents a significant improvement upon previous searches for EMP stars, which have reported success rates of 3-4%. With this efficiency, the Pristine survey is poised to make a significant contribution to constraining the metal-poor tail of the metallicity distribution function, as well as increasing the number of known ultra metal-poor (UMP) stars in the literature. In addition, I will discuss how the Pristine survey is being used to characterise the faint dwarf galaxy population, and analyse substructure in the Galactic Halo.


Video
Tuesday March 24, 2015
Dr. Antonio Hernán-Caballero
IFCA

Abstract

Recent works show that the restframe colours of X-ray selected AGN host galaxies at z~1 are no different from those of inactive galaxies once stellar mass selection effects are taken into account. However, there is a clear deficit of AGN among quiescent galaxies, and the average star formation rates of AGN hosts are comparable or higher than those of inactive star-forming galaxies. These apparently contradictory findings could be a consequence of higher extinction in star-forming AGN hosts compensating for their younger stellar populations in observed colours. In this talk I will present a new method of extinction correction that breaks the degeneracy with stellar age and metallicity by comparing the restframe U-V colour with measurements of the Dn(4000) index on intermediate band photospectra from SHARDS. I'll show that the distribution of extinction corrected U-V colours and Dn(4000) for AGN hosts at z<1 is significantly different from that of comparison samples of inactive galaxies, with a clear deficit of AGN in intrinsic red galaxies and a higher prevalence among those with intermediate age stellar populations.


Video
Thursday December 18, 2014
Dr. Gustavo Bruzual
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Abstract

Stellar population synthesis has reached a high degree of sophistication that has been exploited to understand to a certain extent the mechanisms of formation, assembling, and evolution of galaxies in our universe. Progress is based on solid results in the field of stellar evolution and spectrophotometric observations of large numbers of stars and galaxies. However, there are certain phases of stellar evolution, like the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase, the Wolf-Rayet stage, and the presence of interacting binaries, whose treatment is either ignored or extremely simplified in galaxy evolution models due to the uncertainties in their description. In this talk I will present results from models that add the state of the art in the treatment of these evolutionary phases to traditional population synthesis models. 


Video
Thursday November 20, 2014
Dr. Santi Cassisi
INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo

Abstract

Since the early 50' of last century the study of Horizontal Branch stars in Galactic GCs has been of pivotal relevance since the core He-burning stage is an 'amplifier' of any evolutionary/physical process occurring during the early evolutionary stages. Thanks to the huge observational effort devoted to this issue many outstanding 'anomalies' have been discovered concerning the physical properties of GC HB stars. The situation is becoming more complex when accounting for the discovery of the Multiple Population phenomenon in Galactic GCs. We will review the main anomalies related to the HB evolutionary stage, their (when available) theoretical interpretations, and current shortcomings. We will also discuss how the discovery of the Multiple Population Phenomenon offers a new approach for interpreting many observational evidence.


Video
Friday October 31, 2014
Dr. Fabiola Hernández-Pérez
Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía (CIDA), Venezuela

Abstract

Many stars are observed to belong to multiple systems. Interactions between binary stars may change the evolutionary track of a star, creating atypical stars like Blue Stragglers and explaining the existence of extreme horizontal branch (EHB) stars. Using evolutionary population synthesis models including binary star evolutionary tracks from Hurley et al. and including the two He white dwarfs merger channel, suggested by Han et al., for the formation of EHB stars we compute a series of isochrones which include these atypical stars. We derive the integrated spectral energy distributions and the colors corresponding to these populations. The predictions of this model are in good agreement with traditional population synthesis models, except when the spectrum of the stellar population is dominated by binary stars or their products, e.g., EHB stars in the ultraviolet (UV) of early-type galaxies (ETGs) (Hernández-Pérez and Bruzual 2013). Using this binary population synthesis model we reproduce successfully the observed colour-colour diagram of a sample of 3417 ETGs observed both in the optical (SDSS -DR8) and the UV (GALEX-GR6) (Hernández-Pérez and Bruzual 2014). I will show how important is to consider binary interactions in evolutionary synthesis models.


Video
Thursday October 30, 2014
Prof. Eline Tolstoy
Kaptein Astronomical Intistute

Abstract

I will talk about how resolved stellar populations in the nearby Local Group dwarf galaxies have been used to study the detailed chemical, kinematic and star formation history of these systems and the link to the properties of the Milky Way. I will mainly discuss the results from the DART spectroscopic surveys of nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies, determining detailed abundances, looking for CEMP stars and also combining spectroscopy with colour-magnitude diagram analysis to measure the time scale for star formation and chemical evolution.

 




Video
Thursday June 5, 2014
Dr. Carme Gallart
IAC

Abstract

The Magellanic Clouds are the closest star forming galaxies, and their star formation histories can be derived in great details from color-magnitude diagrams reaching the oldest main sequence turnoffs. In the last several years, we have been conducting a wide research program on the Magellanic Clouds, including both photometry and spectroscopy, and have analysed the star formation history across both the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds. This has revealed the nature of the stellar population gradients of these galaxies, as well as signatures that can possibly be related to their interaction history, among them and with the Milky Way.


Video
Wednesday March 26, 2014
Dr. Thorsten Lisker
Astronomisches Rechen-Institut (ARI), Heidelberg

Abstract

Dwarf galaxies are a complex population. They comprise objects with young and old stellar populations, slow and fast rotation, as well as single- and multi-component structure. These characteristics show correlations with environmental density - we thus believe that dwarf galaxies hold a fossil record of how environment affected galaxy evolution. In this talk I will review and discuss recent progress on our understanding of dwarf galaxies in clusters, both from the observational and the modelling side. In particular, I will attempt to reconcile the proposed formation mechanisms of early-type dwarf galaxies - the most abundant population in clusters - with the continuous environmental influence predicted by cosmological simulations.


Video
Tuesday January 14, 2014
Dr. Anna Ferré-Mateu
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

Abstract

Galaxy clusters are the perfect places to study both the always controversial nature vs nurture problem and the still not well understood evolution that galaxies follow. By studying the properties of the galaxies at different locations of the cluster we can assess the first problem, while studying the same properties over cosmic time, helps constraining the different proposed evolutionary theories. In this work we have focused in an intermediately-redshift rich cluster, RX J0152.7-1357 (z=0.83), by fully characterizing its stellar population properties with new state-of-the-art tools . By this means, we have derived for the first time in such a high-z cluster the ages, metallicities, abundance patterns and Star Formation Histories of the cluster ETGs on an individual galaxy-basis . The relations that these properties follow with galaxy velocity dispersion allow us to discuss a passive evolution scenario with respect to a cluster at z~0. Our results favor a downsizing picture where the relation between the position within the cluster, the velocity dispersion and the type of star formation history of the galaxies allow us to better understand the cluster evolution. We find that the most massive galaxies evolve passively while the lower-mass ones, generally located at the outskirts of the cluster, experience a more extended star formation history related to their later incorporation in the cluster.


Video
Tuesday June 18, 2013
Dr. Giuseppina Battaglia
INAF - Astronomical Observatory of Bologna

Abstract

Crucial issues in cosmology and astrophysics are to understand the
process of galaxy formation and evolution and the nature of what
appears to be the dominant form of matter in the Universe, i.e. dark
matter. Dwarf galaxies provide important information on both of these
issues. In this talk, I will focus on the dwarf galaxies found in the
Local Group, as it is the galaxy population that can be studied in
the greatest detail than any other from the properties of their
resolved stellar populations. I will show how wide-area surveys have
led to a leap forward in our observational understanding of these
galaxies and discuss future prospects.


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