Found 8 talks width keyword Spectral energy distribution

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Tuesday October 1, 2019
Dr. Omaira González Martín
Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, México

Abstract


The dust component of active galactic nuclei (AGN) produces a broad infrared spectral energy distribution (SED), whose power and shape depends on the fraction of the source absorbed, and the geometry of the absorber respectively. This emitting region is expected to be concentrated within the inner ∼5 pc of the AGN which makes almost impossible to image it with the current instruments. The study of the infrared SED by comparison between infrared AGN spectra and predicted models is one of the few ways to infer the properties of the AGN dust. We explore a set of six dusty models of AGN with available SEDs, namely Fritz et al. (2006), Nenkova et al. (2008B), Hoenig & Kishimoto (2010), Siebenmorgen et al. (2015), Stalevski et al. (2016), and Hoenig & Kishimoto (2017). They cover a wide range of morphologies, dust distributions, and compositions.

We explore the discrimination among models and parameter restriction using synthetic spectra (Gonzalez-Martin et al. 2019A), and perform spectral fitting of a sample of 110 AGN with Spitzer/IRS drawn from the Swift/BAT survey (Gonzalez-Martin et al. 2019B). Our conclusion is that most of these models can be discriminated using only mid-infrared spectroscopy as long as the host galaxy contribution is less than 50%. The best model describing the sample is the clumpy disk-wind model by Hoenig & Kishimoto (2017). However, large residuals are shown irrespective of the model used, indicating that AGN dust is more complex than models. We found that the parameter space covered by models is not completely adequate. This talk will give tips for observers and modelers to actually answer the question: how is the dust arrange in AGN? This question will be one of the main subjects of future research using JWST in the AGN field.


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Thursday October 18, 2012
Dr. Miguel Cerviño
IAA

Abstract

The basis of stellar population modeling was established around 40 years ago somehow
optimized to the technical facilities and observational data available at that epoch. Since then,
it has been used extensively in astronomy and there has been great improvements relating
their associated ingredients in concordance with the development of more powerful computational
and observational facilities.
However, there has been no similar improvements in the understanding about what is
actually modeling neither in improve the modeling itself to include the current technical advances
to obtain more accurate result in the physical inferences obtained from them.
In this talk I present some advances in the subject of stellar
population modeling and how to take advantage of current facilities to obtain more robust
and accurate inferences from stellar systems at different scales
covering the continuum between fully resolved populations to fully unresolved ones in a unified framework.


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Thursday May 12, 2011
Miss Sofia Meneses-Goytia
Kapteyn Instituut, Rijkuniversiteit Groningen, the Netherlands

Abstract

The present work shows the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) in the near-infrared using the IRTF stellar library obtained using the models based on the Single Stellar population Models (SSP) from Vazdekis et al. (1996 - 2010) which work in the optical, and use the CaT and MILES stellar libraries. In this near-infrared research, the isochrones of Marigo et al. (2008) were chosen and which have a range of metallicity [Fe/H] between -2.27 and 0.019, and ages up to 15.85 Gy. Also, they provide the corresponding ?uxes in the IR bands I to M (0.7 to 5.0 microns). The IRTF stellar library contains spectra of 292 stars (F, G, K and M stars) at a resolution of 2000, between 0.8 to 5.2 microns. The features of the SED (spectrum obtained by the integration of the spectra of the stars, at constant metallicity and age) are analysed by comparing to those found on Ivanov et al. (2004) for the IR range. In addition, t he comparison of the models with galaxy observations of early type galaxies by Marmol-Queralto et al. (2009) are presented.


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Thursday April 28, 2011
Dr. Alberto Dominguez Diaz
Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, Spain

Abstract

The extragalactic background light (EBL) is of fundamental importance both for understanding the entire process of galaxy evolution and for gamma-ray astronomy, but the overall spectrum of the EBL between 0.1 and 1000 microns has never been determined directly from galaxy spectral energy distribution (SED) observations over a wide redshift range. Galaxy SED-type fractions from z=0.2-1 are estimated from a multi-wavelength sample from the AEGIS collaboration that allows a new determination of the evolving EBL. Then, the transparency of the Universe to very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray photons is derived. We find the maximum transparency of the Universe allowed by the standard framework. This result challenges current VHE observations of high redshift blazars. A solution to this problem is discussed utilizing VHE spectra of the highest redshift blazars assuming the existence of a plausible dark matter candidate known as axion-like particle.


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Tuesday May 11, 2010
Drs. Alexandre Vazdekis; Elena Ricciardelli; Jesús Falcón Barroso
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

We present the new stellar population synthesis models based on the empirical stellar spectral library MILES, which can be regarded nowadays as standard in the field of stellar population studies. The synthetic SEDs cover the whole optical range at resolution 2.3 Å (FWHM). The unprecedented stellar parameter coverage of MILES allowed us to extend our model predictions from intermediate- to very-old age regimes, and the metallicity coverage from super-solar to [M/H] = -2.3. Observed spectra can be studied by means of full spectrum fitting or line-strengths. For the latter we propose a new Line Index System (LIS) to avoid the intrinsic uncertainties associated with the popular Lick/IDS system and provide more appropriate, uniform, spectral resolution. We present a web-page with a suite of on-line tools to facilitate the handling and transformation of the spectra. Online examples with practical applications to work with stellar spectra for a variety of instrumental setups will be shown. Furthermore we will also show examples of how to compute spectra and colors with varying instrumental setup, redshift and velocity dispersion for a suite of Star Formation Histories.


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Thursday March 11, 2010
Dr. Almudena Prieto
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the central few tens of parsec region of some of the nearest active galactic nuclei (AGN) are presented. Peering into the nucleus at these scales, it is found that the intrinsic shape of the spectral energy distribution of an AGN and inferred bolometric luminosity largely depart from those currently on use, mostly extracted from low resolution data. The shape of the SED is different and the AGN luminosities can be overestimated by up to two orders of magnitude if relying on IR satellite data.
Although the shape of these SEDs are currently limited by the availability of high angular resolution data beyond ~20 μ, a prediction from this work is that a major contribution from cold dust below 100 K to these cores is not expected. Over the nine orders of magnitude in frequency covered by these SEDs, the power stored in the IR bump is by far the most energetic fraction of the total energy budget in these cores, accounting for more than 70% of the total.

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Tuesday February 23, 2010
Dr. Carlos Hernández-Monteagudo
Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Germany

Abstract

The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) has been observing the southern sky in the millimeter range with an angular resolution at the arc-minute level. An analysis of 228 square degrees observed at 148 GHz along a stripe centered at declination -53 degrees reveals the presence of the Silk damping tail in the temperature angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This decaying tail becomes truncated by a rising spectrum at scales corresponding to few arcmins (l ~ 3000) whose origin is compatible with a unclustered population of unresolved point sources and some residual anisotropy due to Compton scattering of CMB photons off free electrons (the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect). Comparisons with other observations and constraints on different components giving rise to this secondary spectrum are discussed.

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Thursday October 9, 2008
Dr. Juan Antonio Fernández Ontiveros
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

Starbursts and AGNs are frequently coupled in the central kiloparsecs of Seyfert galaxies, where molecular gas plays a critical role in fueling nuclear starburst activity and feeding the central black hole. Unveiling the dusty nuclear regions with high-spatial resolution techniques in the near-infrared (NIR) permits us to disentangle the AGN and the stellar clusters, characterizing both sources separately. In this context, a small sample of nearby galaxies have been observed with VLT/NaCo adaptive optics in the NIR. These observations were completed with similar high-spatial resolution data in the mid-infrared (VLT/VISIR), optical (HST) and radio wavelengths (VLA). A new alignment for the starburst galaxy NGC 253 was found based on NIR and radio data, due to the high-spatial resolution in both spectral regions, finding NIR counterparts for 8 known radio sources. It is remarkable the lack of any optical or IR counterpart for the radio core, proposed as a low luminosity AGN, which presents an IR-to-radio emission ratio similar (or even lower) than Sgr. A*. Using the high-spatial resolution aligned dataset from optical-IR to radio wavelengths we derived a representative spectral energy distribution (SED) based on 37 young dust embedded clusters resolved in the inner 0.4 kpc. The template is characterized by a maximum at 20 μ and a gentle bump in the 1-2 μ range. These features, absent in lower spatial resolution templates, can be well reproduced by considering an important contribution of very young stellar objects to the IR, and are thus associated with hot dust surrounding the protostars. The average SED was then compared with the nuclear star forming regions found in the Seyfert 2/starburst galaxy NGC 7582.

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