Found 7 talks width keyword mass function

Pavel_Kroupa_150618s
Thursday June 18, 2015
Prof. Pavel Kroupa
Univ. of Bonn

Abstract

The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is usually assumed to be a probability density distribution function. Recent data appear to question this interpretation though, and I will discuss alternative applications and results concerning the possibly true nature of the IMF. Empirical evidence has emerged that the IMF becomes top-heavy in intense star bursts and at low metallicity. Related to the IMF are binary star distribution functions, and these evolve through dynamical processes in embedded star clusters. The insights gained from these considerations lead to a mathematically computable method for calculating stellar populations in galaxies, with possibly important implications for the matter cycle in galaxies. It turns out that the galaxy-wide IMF, the IGIMF, becomes increasingly top-heavy with increasing galaxy-wide star formation rate, while at the same time the binary fraction in the galactic field decreases.


lee_kelvin_141016s
Thursday October 16, 2014
Dr. Lee Kelvin
University of Innsbruck

Abstract

What can the shape and size of a galaxy tell us about how it has evolved across cosmic time? Which evolutionary mechanisms are important, or relevant, and which not? How do galaxies form in the early Universe? As we enter a new era of big-data astronomy, our capacity to further pursue answers to these questions is increasingly limited not by Human ingenuity but by our use of 20th century data analysis techniques. In this talk, I will summarise my work with the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) Survey in measuring the multi-wavelength light profile and stellar mass properties of ~200,000 galaxies in the local Universe. I will show how the stellar mass function may be broken down by morphology and structural component, and the implications this has for our understanding on which evolutionary mechanisms are important in shaping the galaxies around us over the course of the last 1 billion years. 


helena_dominguez_sanchez_130219s
Tuesday February 19, 2013
Dr. Helena Domínguez Sánchez
IAC

Abstract

In this talk we will show the evolution of high-redshift (z≥ 1.4) quiescent galaxies in the COSMOS field. We have studied an IRAC (mag 3.6 μm < 22.0) selected sample of ~ 18 000 galaxies at z≥ 1.4 in the COSMOS field with multiwavelength coverage extending from the U band to the Spitzer 24 μm one. We have derived accurate photometric redshifts and other important physical parameters [masses, ages and star formation rates (SFR)] through a SED-fitting procedure. Galaxies have been divided according to their star formation activity into actively star-forming, intermediate and quiescent galaxies depending on their specific star formation rate (sSFR = SFR/M). The evolution of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Funtion (GSMF) of the different populations, in particular of the quiescent galaxies, has been investigated in detail. There is a significant evolution of the quiescent stellar mass function from 2.5 < z < 3.0 to 1.4 < z < 1.6, increasing by ~1 dex in this redshift interval. We find that z ~1.5 is an epoch of transition of the GSMF: while the GSMF at z≳ 1.5 is dominated by the star-forming galaxies at all stellar masses, at z≲ 1.5 the contribution to the total GSMF of the quiescent galaxies is significant and becomes higher than that of the star-forming population for M≥ 1010.75 Msun. We derive the fraction of quiescent/star-forming galaxies with redshift, as well as the stellar mass density. We also compare our results with the predictions of theoretical models. Finally, I will introduce my current project: studying in deeper detail the IRAC drop-outs of the sample with new nIR (ULTRA-VISTA) and fIR (Herschel) data to elucidate between very dust-obscured objects or high-z star forming galaxies, which could help us to put some constrains to the high-mass end of the GSMF at high-z.


miguel_cervino_121018s
Thursday October 18, 2012
Dr. Miguel Cerviño
IAA

Abstract

The basis of stellar population modeling was established around 40 years ago somehow
optimized to the technical facilities and observational data available at that epoch. Since then,
it has been used extensively in astronomy and there has been great improvements relating
their associated ingredients in concordance with the development of more powerful computational
and observational facilities.
However, there has been no similar improvements in the understanding about what is
actually modeling neither in improve the modeling itself to include the current technical advances
to obtain more accurate result in the physical inferences obtained from them.
In this talk I present some advances in the subject of stellar
population modeling and how to take advantage of current facilities to obtain more robust
and accurate inferences from stellar systems at different scales
covering the continuum between fully resolved populations to fully unresolved ones in a unified framework.


remon_cornelisse_100720s
Tuesday July 20, 2010
Dr. Remon Cornelisse
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

For most persistent low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and transients in outbursts the optical emission is dominated by reprocessing of the X-rays in the outer accretion disk. This has severely hampered any dynamical studies and thereby our knowledge of their system parameters. A new avenue opened thanks to the discovery of narrow high-excitation emission components arising from the irradiated companion star. These lines are most prominent in the Bowen region (a blend of N III and C III lines between 4630 and 4650 Å). In this talk I will discuss this new technique, give an overview of the main results of our survey on the optically brightest LMXBs, and discuss the implications for their system parameters. Furthermore, I will point out the main limitations of this technique and how they might be overcome.

marina_vika_100211s
Thursday February 11, 2010
Dr. Marina Vika
University of St Andrews, UK

Abstract

We present our latest measurement of the SMBH mass function at redshift zero based on detailed structural studies of 1743 galaxies extracted from the B-band Millennium Galaxy Catalogue. Using the empirical correlations between the mass of the black hole and the photometric properties of the spheroid, MBH-L and MBH-n we estimated the SMBH mass of each galaxy and from this construct empirically derived SMBH mass functions. In addition, using a sample of 30 nearby elliptical and spiral galaxies, we will present new results showing the near-IR correlation between bulge properties and SMBH mass.

hans_zinnecker_081029s
Wednesday October 29, 2008
Dr. Hans Zinnecker
Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, Germany

Abstract

In the first (optical) part, we present our recent results on mass and luminosity function of Galactic open clusters, a new statistical study based on the ASCC-2.5 catalogue of bright stars, complete to about 1 kpc around the Sun. This includes a new determination of the fraction of field stars born in open clusters. It also briefly addresses the issue whether all massive stars are exclusively born in clusters. In the second (infrared) part, we discuss the prospects of a 42m European ELT to "see" the origin of massive stars in dense embedded protoclusters, by penetrating dense proto- cluster clouds up to 200 mag of visual extinction at 2-5 microns. High-angular resolution AO imaging as well as 3D integral field spectroscopy are required to study the stellar density, binary content, and dynamical properties of these highly obscured, massive, compact star clusters.

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