Latest talks

List of all the talks in the archive, sorted by date.


artie_hatzes_181115s
Thursday November 15, 2018
Dr. A. P. Hatzes
Thuringia State Observatory

Abstract

In 1988 I joined the quest find exoplanets with the radial velocity method. At the time, exoplanet research was virtually unknown, and no extra-solar planets had been discovered. Since then, we have discovered several thousand extra-solar planets found mostly via the radial velocity and transit methods.

Planets with masses as low as the Earth and even in the habitable zone of low mass stars have been detected. We have also taken the first steps to characterize these new worlds in terms of their masses, radii, densities, internal structure and atmospheric composition. This was unforeseen thirty years ago. In my talk I will review the expectations we had when we first started searching for extra-solar planet, he surprises along the way, and what to expect in the future from extra-solar planet research.


Thursday November 8, 2018
Prof. Mario Juric
University of Washington

Abstract

Lecture 4 by Mario


Wednesday November 7, 2018
Prof. Mario Juric
University of Washington

Abstract

Lecture 3 by Mario


Wednesday November 7, 2018
Prof. George Djorgovski
Caltech, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy

Abstract

Lecture 3 by George


Riccardo_Scarpa_181106s
Tuesday November 6, 2018
Dr. Riccardo Scarpa
GTC support astronomer -- IAC

Abstract

By the time, in 1937, the Zwicky measured the velocity dispersion of the Coma cluster, astronomers somehow got acquainted with the idea that the universe is filled by some kind of dark matter. After almost a century of investigations, we have learned two things about it, (i) it has to be non-baryonic - that is, made of something new that interact with normal matter only by gravitation- and, (ii) that its effects are observed in stellar systems when and only when their internal acceleration of gravity falls below a fix value a0=1.2×10-8 cm s-2. Being completely decoupled dark and normal matter can mix in any ratio to form the objects we see in the Universe, and indeed observations show the relative content of dark matter to vary dramatically from object to object. This is in open contrast with point (ii). In fact, there is no reason why normal and dark matter should conspire to mix in just the right way for the mass discrepancy to appear always below a fixed acceleration. This systematic, more than anything else, tells us we might be facing a failure of the law of gravity in the weak field limit rather then the effects of dark matter. Thus, in an attempt to avoid the need for dark matter many modifications of the law of gravity have been proposed in the past decades. The most successful - and the only one that survived observational tests - is the Modified Newtonian Dynamics. MOND posits a breakdown of Newton's law of gravity (or inertia) below a0, after which the dependence with distance became linear. Despite many attempts, MOND resisted stubbornly to be falsified as an alternative to dark matter and succeeds in explaining the properties of an impressively large number of objects without invoking the presence of non-baryonic dark matter. This suggests MOND is telling us something important about gravity in the weak field limit. In this talk I will review the basics of MOND and its ability to explain observations without the need of dark matter.


Tuesday November 6, 2018
Prof. Mario Juric
University of Washington

Abstract

Lecture 2 by Mario


Tuesday November 6, 2018
Prof. George Djorgovski
Caltech, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy

Abstract

Lecture 2 by George


Rainer_Kuschnig_181105s
Monday November 5, 2018
Dr. Rainer Kuschnig
Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria

Abstract

BRITE-Constellation (BRight Target Explorer) consists of six nano-satellites aiming to study of variability of the brightest stars in the sky. Austria, Poland, and Canada contribute two spacecraft each all launched into low earth orbits. The satellites have the same structure: they are 20 cm cubes, 7kg mass, with a CCD photometer fed by 3 cm aperture telescopes. The main difference between pairs of satellites is the instrument passband which set to blue (400-450nm) or red (550-700nm). The core scientific objective is to obtain high precision two color photometry, with a time base of up to 180 days, of stars brighter than 4.5 mag in order to study stellar pulsations, spots, and granulation, eclipsing binaries, search for planets and more.
Since the launch of the first two BRITE satellites in February 2013 more than 5 and a half years of experiences in space have been gathered to run the mission and a summary of lessons learned will be presented.  By now more than 20 peer-reviewed scientific articles have been published based on data collected by BRITE-Constellation satellites in space and most results presented therein benefitted greatly from supplementary spectroscopy by meter size telescopes obtained on ground.


Monday November 5, 2018
Prof. Mario Juric
University of Washington

Abstract

Lecture 1 by Mario


Monday November 5, 2018
Prof. George Djorgovski
Caltech, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy

Abstract

Lecture 1 by George



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