Latest talks

List of all the talks in the archive, sorted by date.


Video
Friday May 19, 2017
Mr. Juan Cózar
IAC

Abstract

Introducción a los aspectos a tener en cuenta en el diseño de la mecánica de instrumentación aeroespacial, con una breve descripción de las especificaciones propiciadas por el ambiente, cargas, materiales, aspectos térmicos finalizando con diseños de optomecánica y mecanismos.


Video
Friday May 19, 2017
Mr. Carlos Colodro
IAC

Abstract

Fundamentos de detectores de imagen en el rango visible y su uso en aplicaciones de observación de la Tierra.


Video
Friday May 19, 2017
Mr. Alberto Bueno
IAC

Abstract

Diferentes usos de la observación desde el espacio. Descripción de los sistemas ópticos, ejemplos de misiones y algunos problemas del pasado.


Video
Friday May 19, 2017
Mr. Abel Mora
IAC

Abstract

Visión global de todas las fases que sigue el ciclo de vida de un proyecto aeroespacial.


Video
Friday May 19, 2017
Dr. Inés Serrano
IAC

Abstract

A la hora de diseñar un satélite debemos considerarlo como parte de un sistema más grande compuesto por el segmento Tierra, el lanzador y por último el segmento espacio. El diseño de un satélite estará determinado por el tipo de misión que realizará, su presupuesto y duración; por el lanzador, su modo y trayectoria de lanzamiento; por los materiales y piezas a usar y su vida útil; por la estación en Tierra; etc. En esta charla se hace un breve resumen de los elementos que forman parte del segmento Tierra y del lanzador y se habla más extensamente del satélite, i.e. la plataforma y la carga útil.


Video
Friday May 19, 2017
Dr. Samuel Sordo
IAC

Abstract

La primera parte de la charla está dedicada a una introducción a las misiones espaciales, presentando una breve perspectiva histórica de los casi 60 años de vida de la exploración espacial, junto con un análisis de los retos y tendencias actuales asociados al auge de los satélites de pequeño tamaño. La segunda parte de la charla está dedicada al análisis de las condiciones extremas de operación en el espacio y sus efectos sobre la intrumentación, incidiendo especialmente en los efectos de la radiación sobre los sistemas electrónicos.


Video
Friday May 19, 2017
Dr. Pablo Redondo, Dr. Alex Ozcoz
IAC

Abstract

Presentación del curso "Introducción a la instrumentación para satélites de observación de la Tierra" por parte de Pablo Redondo y Alex Ozcoz.


Video
Thursday May 18, 2017
Prof. Caitlin Casey
University of Texas (USA)

Abstract

The Universe’s largest galaxy clusters likely built the majority of their massive >10^11 M⊙ galaxies in simultaneous, short-lived bursts of activity well before virialization. The most challenging observational hurdle in identifying such pre-virialized “protoclusters” is their very large volumes, ~10^4 comoving Mpc^3 at z > 2, subtending areas ~half a degree on the sky. Thus the contrast afforded by an overabundance of very rare galaxies in comparison to the background can more easily distinguish overdense structures from the surrounding, normal density field. There are now five well-known 2 < z < 3 proto-clusters from the literature which are found to contain up to 12 dusty starbursts or luminous AGN galaxies each, a phenomenon that is unlikely to occur by chance even in overdense environments. I will discuss these in addition to some higher-redshift (4 < z < 5.5) groups, whose evolutionary fate is less clear. Measurements of DSFGs’ gas depletion times suggest that they are indeed short-lived on ~100 Myr timescales, and accordingly the probability of finding a structure containing more than 8 such systems is 0.2%, unless their ‘triggering’ is correlated on very large spatial scales, ~10 Mpc across. The volume density of DSFG-rich protoclusters is found to be comparable to all >10^15 M⊙ galaxy clusters in the nearby Universe, a factor of five larger than expected in some simulations. Some tension yet exists between measurements and simulations. However, improved observations of protoclusters over large regions of sky will certainly shed more light on the assembly of galaxy clusters, thus fundamental parameters governing cosmology, and also the role of environment in shaping the formation and evolution of galaxies.


Video
Thursday May 11, 2017
Dr. Evanthia Hatziminaoglou
ESO, Garching (Germany)

Abstract

ALMA is a submillimetre/millimetre telescope located at 5000m in the Atacama desert in Chile designed to observe at 0.32–9.5 mm (31–950 GHz), and it is expected to be the leading observatory in these wavelengths for many decades to come. ALMA has performed scientific observations since September 2011, with new capabilities being offered for each new observing cycle. The interface between ALMA and the astronomical community is provided by the ALMA Regional Centres (ARCs). The European ARC is located at ESO, Garching. In Europe, the services to the community are provided by a distributed network of ARC nodes. The European ARC network is an international, geographically dispersed structure, and consists of the central ARC at ESO, seven ARC nodes and one Centre of Expertise, distributed across Europe. It is an organised effort to provide the European ALMA user community with uniform expert support from the stage of proposal preparation through to data reduction, in order to enable the optimal usage and increase the scientific output of ALMA. The model for the European ARC nodes network will be described in terms of its organisation, communication strategies and user support. ALMA capabilities and recent ALMA results will also be summarised.
Depending on the interest of the participants, the talk can be followed by a small demo of the ALMA Observing Tool (OT) for the creation and submission of ALMA proposals, as well as the ALMA Snooping Project Interface (SnooPI), that allows PIs and Co-Is to follow their projects throughout their life-cycle.


Video
Wednesday May 10, 2017
Dr. Vitaly Neustroev
University of Turku & University of Oulu (Finland)

Abstract

According to standard evolutionary theory, cataclysmic variables (CV) evolve from longer to shorter orbital periods until a minimum period P_min is reached.
The period bouncers are such CVs that have passed 
beyond P_min and are evolving back toward longer periods, with the donor star now extremely dim.
This has long been predicted to be the 
"graveyard" and current state of 70% of all CVs, though only about a dozen of more or less robust candidates for
such period bouncer 
systems have been identified until now, out of a thousand of known CVs.
In this talk I will discuss the various methods by which such 
post period-minimum CVs can be recognized, and will also highlight recent progress in this field.



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