Found 39 talks width keyword dark matter

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Tuesday September 13, 2022
Dr. Martín López Corredoira
IAC

Abstract

Cosmological observations (redshifts, cosmic microwave background radiation, abundance of light elements, formation and evolution of galaxies, large-scale structure) find explanations within the standard Lambda-CDM model, although many times after a number of ad hoc corrections. Nevertheless, the expression ‘crisis in cosmology’ stubbornly reverberates in the scientific literature: the higher the precision with which the standard cosmological model tries to fit the data, the greater the number of tensions that arise. Moreover, there are alternative explanations for most of the observations. Therefore, cosmological hypotheses should be very cautiously proposed and even more cautiously received.

There are also sociological and philosophical arguments to support this scepticism. Only the standard model is considered by most professional cosmologists, while the challenges of the most fundamental ideas of modern cosmology are usually neglected. Funding, research positions, prestige, telescope time, publication in top journals, citations, conferences, and other resources are dedicated almost exclusively to standard cosmology. Moreover, religious, philosophical, economic, and political ideologies in a world dominated by anglophone culture also influence the contents of cosmological ideas.


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Thursday February 10, 2022
Dr. Marcos Pellejero
DIPC

Abstract

A key problem that we are facing in cosmology nowadays is that we cannot make accurate predictions with our current theoretical models. We have all of the pieces of the standard model but it doesn't have an analytical solution. The only way to have accurate predictions is to run a cosmological simulation. Then, why not use these simulations as the theory model? Well, for one main reason, if we want to explore the full parameter space comprised in the standard model, we need thousands of such simulations, and they are terribly computationally expensive. We wouldn't be able to do it in years! In this talk, I will tell you how in the last few years we have come up with a way to circumvent this problem.


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Thursday November 4, 2021
Dr. Sergio Contreras
DIPC

Abstract

 

On the LCDM cosmology, dark matter collapses into virialised objects called haloes. The abundance and distribution of these haloes are a direct consequence of the cosmology of the Universe. By constraining the dark matter halo clustering, we could also constraint the cosmology from our Universe. Since dark matter haloes can not be observed, we need to use galaxies to trace them.

In this talk, I will present a new method that we develop capable of constraining cosmological information from the redshift space galaxy clustering.  We use the scaling of cosmological simulations and the SubHalo Abundance Matching extended (SHAMe) empirical model to produce realistic galaxy clustering measurements over a wide range of cosmologies. We generate more than 500,000 clustering measurements at different cosmological and SHAMe parameters to build an emulator capable of reproducing the projected correlation function, monopole and quadrupole of the galaxies. We run an MCMC using this emulator to constrain the cosmology of the TNG300 hydrodynamic simulation. We correctly predicted the cosmology of the TNG300 simulation constraining sigma8 between [0.75,0.83] and Omega matter h^2 between [0.127,0.162]. The best constraints are obtained when including scales below 2 Mpc/h and when combining all different clustering statistics. We conclude that our approach can be used to constrain cosmological and galaxy formation parameters from the galaxy clustering of galaxy surveys.

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Thursday June 3, 2021
Dr. Javier Redondo
Universidad de Zaragoza

Abstract

We introduce the strong CP problem and the existence of the Axion as a possible solution. 

We discuss the possibility that axions are the dark matter of the Universe and the possible ways to

detect it or disprove it using: direct laboratory experiments as well as astrophysical and cosmological

arguments. 

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Thursday May 13, 2021
Prof. Diego Blas
Imperial College

Abstract

Bosonic ultra-light dark matter (ULDM) in the mass range m ~ $10^{-22} - 10^{-21} \rm eV$ has been invoked as a motivated candidate with new input for the small-scale `puzzles' of cold dark matter. Numerical simulations show that these models form cored density distributions at the center of galaxies ('solitons'). These works also found an empirical scaling relation between the mass of the large-scale host halo and the mass of the central soliton. We show that this relation predicts that the peak circular velocity of the outskirts of the galaxy should approximately repeat itself in the central region. Contrasting this prediction to the measured rotation curves of well-resolved near-by galaxies, we show that ULDM in the mass range m ~ $10^{-22} - 10^{-21} \rm eV$ is in tension with the data.


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Tuesday May 11, 2021
Prof. Rodrigo Alonso
Durham University

Abstract

Cosmological and astrophysical experimental data demark a large share of the limits of our knowledge in fundamental physics. I'll review two pieces of evidence of our ignorance: the nature of dark matter and the generation of baryon asymmetry in the universe, together with some of the proposed solutions to each. Finally, a novel connection between the two open problems will be presented.


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Thursday April 29, 2021
Prof. Steen Hansen
COpenhagenUNi / DARK cosmology center

Abstract

The expansion of the Universe is in an accelerated phase. This
acceleration was first estabilished by observations of SuperNovae, and
has since been confirmed through a range of independent observations.

The physical cause of this acceleration is coined Dark Energy, and
most observations indicate that Einsteins cosmological constant
provides a very good fit. In that case, approximately 70% of the
energy of the Universe presently consists of this cosmological
constant.

I will in this talk address the possibility that there may exist other
possible causes of the observed acceleration. In particular will I
discuss a concrete model, inspired by the well-known Lorentz force in
electromagnetism, where Dark Matter causes the acceleration.  With a
fairly simple numerical simulation we find that the model appears
consistent with all observations.

In such a model, where Dark Matter properties causes the acceleration
of the Universe, there is no need for a cosmological constant.


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Tuesday April 27, 2021
Dr. Lorenzo Posti
Observatorie Astronomique de Strasbourg

Abstract

 

It is widely understood that galaxies use, throughout the Hubble time, only a small fraction of the baryons associated to their dark matter halos to form stars. Such low baryon-to-stars conversion efficiencies are expected in galaxy formation scenarios where stellar & AGN feedback play a key role in regulating star formation in galaxies, respectively at the low- and high-mass end.
In this talk I will show how we can constrain this scenario using galaxy dynamics. Both robust determinations of disc dynamical scaling relations (e.g. Tully-Fisher, mass-size) and accurate measurements of dark matter halo masses from HI rotation curves of spirals and from the kinematics of globular clusters around ellipticals, provide compelling evidence that the population of massive spirals has systematically larger baryon-to-stars conversion efficiencies than ellipticals. In fact, we see that the baryon-to-stars conversion efficiency monotonically increases with mass for late-type galaxies, while it shows a clear turn over at about L* only for early-type galaxies. Thus, while massive early types are compatible with standard stellar-to-halo mass relations based on abundance matching, massive late types are systematically discrepant from it.
I will discuss the possible repercussions that these results have, highlighting in particular what they imply in terms of AGN feedback and merging in galaxies of different types. Finally I will show that current state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations (EAGLE, TNG) still struggle to reproduce what we observe for the most massive discs.

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Tuesday June 23, 2020
Javier de Miguel Hernández
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias

Abstract

Axion detection would be one of the most exciting moments in the entire history of science. This hypothetical particle can simultaneously explain two fundamental problems in Modern Physics: the mystery of dark matter and the CP problem of the strong interaction. In this talk, I will provide an overview of the status for the search for axions and I will explain how the DALI experiment can go beyond these frontiers.

 

https://rediris.zoom.us/j/98051612614



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Wednesday December 3, 2014
Dr. Tobias Goerdt
Wien Univ.

Abstract

Cold gas streaming along the dark-matter filaments of the cosmic web is predicted to be the major provider of resources for disc buildup and star formation in massive galaxies in the early universe. We use hydrodynamical simulations to study to what extent these cold streams are traceable in the extended circum-galactic environment of galaxies via Ly alpha emission, Ly alpha absorption and selected low ionisation metal absorption lines. We predict the strength of the absorption signal produced by the streams and find that it is consistent with observations in high redshift galaxies. The characteristics of the Ly alpha emission of our simulated galaxies are similar in luminosity, morphology and extent to the observed Ly alpha blobs, with distinct kinematic features. We analyse the characteristics of the cold streams in simulations and present scaling relations for the amount of infall, its velocity, distribution and its clumpiness and compare our findings with observations.


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