Found 14 talks width keyword supernovae

9kPuzJMmNkM-thumbnail
Thursday July 25, 2019
Prof. Mike Barlow
University College London

Abstract

Until the advent in the late 1990’s of sensitive submillimetre arrays such as SCUBA, it was generally thought that the main sources for the interstellar dust found in galaxies were the dusty outflows from evolved AGB stars and M supergiants, although a dust contribution from supernovae had long been predicted on theoretical grounds. The detection at submillimetre wavelengths of very large dust masses in some high redshift galaxies emitting less than a billion years after the Big Bang led to a more serious consideration of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) from massive stars as major dust contributors. KAO and Spitzer mid-infrared observations confirmed that CCSN ejecta could form dust but it was not until the Herschel mission and subsequent ALMA observations that direct evidence has been obtained for the presence of significantly large masses of cold dust in young CCSN remnants. As well as using infrared spectral energy distributions to measure the amounts of dust forming in CCSN ejecta, dust masses can also be quantified from the analysis of red-blue asymmetries in their late-time optical emission line profiles. I will describe current results from these methods for estimating ejecta dust masses, and their implications.


tmJKAfHPH-Y-thumbnail
Tuesday July 16, 2019
Dr. Danny Lennon
IAC

Abstract

The existence of apparently isolated massive stars has been recognized for some time, and various explanations have been proposed to explain these ranging from isolated star formation to variouscluster ejection mechanisms. In this talk I will present recent results from Gaia and Hubble on stellar dynamics within the Tarantula Nebula/30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. I will discuss how these complementary datasets have improved our knowledge of this nearby mini-starburst. The first results indicate the existence of a few stars in the region with masses ~100 solar masses that have been ejected from the central dense cluster R136. Ejection velocities appear torange from a few 10s of km/s to ~100 km/s. Given the extreme youth of R136 it is therefore likely that the mechanism of ejection was via the dynamical interaction channel rather than the binary supernova ejection scenario.


2SyrTbipNCc-thumbnail
Thursday June 6, 2019
Prof. Jon Marcaide
University of Valencia

Abstract

Supernova SN1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud offers an unprecedented opportunity to tackle fundamental issues of supernova explosions: dust and molecule formation, interaction with the circumstellar medium, particle acceleration, pulsar formation, etc. Since 2011, instruments like ALMA have been fundamental for such endeavor. Tomographic techniques have recently permitted to obtain 3D-images of the molecular emission. High-resolution images of dust emission have recently been obtained. All those results, compared with predictions from hydro-dynamical simulations, are paving the way to a better understanding of supernovae explosions. In the talk, the main results will be highlighted with emphasis on the advances produced since 2017 in the understanding of the structure of the inner ejecta or debris.


iWEtfV3vCZ0-thumbnail
Thursday September 10, 2015
Prof. Noah Soker
Physics Department TECHNION, Israel

Abstract

I will describe the roles of jets in several quite different astrophysical systems. These include exploding core collapse supernovae, expelling common envelopes, and heating gas in clusters of galaxies. Hot bubbles inflated by jets seem to be a key ingredient in the interaction of jets with the ambient gas. The understanding that jets can efficiently interact with the ambient gas leads to new notions, such as the jittering jets model to explode massive stars, and the grazing envelope evolution(GEE) that can replace the common envelope evolution in some cases.

wrafHd6sfQc-thumbnail
Thursday April 23, 2015
Dr. Matteo Miluzio
IAC

Abstract

With the aim of testing the relation between supernova (SN) rate and star formation rate, we conducted a SN search in a sample of local starburst galaxies (SBs) where both star formation rates and extinction are extremely high. The search was performed in the near-infrared, where the bias due to extinction is reduced using HAWK-I on the VLT. We discovered six SNe, in excellent agreement with expectations, when considering that, even in our search, about 60% of events remain hidden in the nuclear regions due to a combination of reduced search efficiency and very high extinction.
In addition I will present my plans for next months at IAC for the "Starbursts and EMIR project". I will participate in the commissioning of the instrument at La Palma, collaborating in the development of the ETC and I  will compile a catalog of starbursts for EMIR with the aim to study their imprint in the cosmic evolution of galaxies.


yVmNoEaMnsU-thumbnail
Tuesday October 21, 2014
Dr. Michael Bode
Astrophysics Research Institute (Univ. John Moores Liverpoool)

Abstract

The Astrophysics Research Institute (ARI) was established at LJMU in 1992. Today the Institute comprises around 70 staff and research students working on topics ranging from stellar evolution to cosmology. In this talk I will give an overview and some highlights of the work undertaken in recent years on Classical and Recurrent novae by the nova group of the ARI. This involves multi-frequency observations of both Galactic novae and those in Local Group galaxies and includes topics such as the exploration of their potential links to the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Along the way, I will briefly describe the work of the Liverpool Telescope on La Palma, one of whose primary science drivers is the efficient and effective observation of transient objects such as these, and look forward to our plans for the development of an even larger and faster-reacting robotic telescope at ORM - currently codenamed 'LT2".


-thumbnail
Friday October 5, 2012
Dr. Jonay González Hernández
IAC

Abstract

Type-Ia supernovae (SNIa) are believed to be thermonuclear explosions of accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarfs that reach the Chandrasekhar mass limit of about 1.39 solar masses. However, the nature of the companion star is still under debate, i.e. to be either a dwarf, a sub giant, or a giant star (single-degenerate channel), or another white dwarf (double-degenerate channel). Both channels have been proposed but their relative frequency remains unclear. We have been exploring regions close to the center of supernova remnants of Galactic SNe to search for the companion of these type-Ia SNe. I will show the very recent results we have found in two Galactic type-Ia SNe.


wXxW7e5m6SI-thumbnail
Tuesday December 20, 2011
Dr. Nancy Elías de la Rosa
IEEC, Spain

Abstract

Supernovae are at the heart of some of the most important problems of modern astronomy. To fully understand their importance and to enable their use as probes of stellar evolution throughout cosmic time, it is
absolutely essential to determine their stellar origins, i.e., their progenitors or progenitor systems. Even with over 5600 known SNe, we have only direct information about the progenitor star for a handful of explosions. Based on the statistics of 20 SNe II-P for which progenitors have been isolated or upper mass limits established, it has been derived a
more limited range of 8-17 solar masses for these stars, and it appears that all of these progenitors exploded in the RSG phase, as we would theoretically expect. However there has been no detection of a higher mass stars in the range 20-40 solar masses, which should be the most luminous and brightest stars in these galaxies. Therefore, I will present here the
results of our group in the analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and deep ground-based images, isolating the massive progenitor stars of several recent core-collapse supernovae.


VC9Ff7SMe0U-thumbnail
Friday March 25, 2011
Dr. Anne Sansom
University of Central Lancashire, UK

Abstract

Spectroscopic analysis of stellar populations is widely used to understand the history of many systems including globular clusters, nuclear star clusters, dwarf galaxies through to giant galaxies over a wide range of redshifts. In this talk I first explore aspects of stellar population fitting, focussing on the effects of interacting binary stars on the yields and hence the spectra of early-type galaxies. The second part of the talk concentrates on what we know about supernovae type Ia and the importance of understanding their contributions to the chemical evolution of galaxies and stellar populations.


3stx_-RFGT4-thumbnail
Thursday November 4, 2010
Dr. Felix Mirabel
CEA, Service d'Astrophysique, France

Abstract

The so called "dark ages" of the universe began about 400.000 years after the Big Bang as matter cooled down and space became filled with neutral hydrogen for hundreds of millions years. How the Universe was heated and reionized during the first billion years after the Big Bang is a question of topical interest in cosmology. I will show that current theoretical models on the formation and collapse of primordial stars suggest that a large fraction of massive stars should have imploded, forming high-mass black hole X-ray binaries. Then, I will review the recent observations of compact stellar remnants in the near and distant universe that support this theoretical expectation, showing that the thermal (UV and soft X-rays) and non-thermal (hard X-rays, winds and jets) emission from a large population of stellar black holes in high mass binaries heated the intergalactic medium over large volumes of space, complementing the reionization by their stellar progenitors. Feedback from accreting stellar black holes at that epoch would have prevented the formation of the large quantities of low mass dwarf galaxies that are predicted by the cold dark matter model of the universe. A large population of black hole binaries may be important for future observations of gravitational waves as well as for the existing and future atomic hydrogen radio surveys of HI in the early universe.

« Newer 1 | 2 Last >>

Upcoming talks


More upcoming talks

Featured talks