Found 5 talks width keyword stellar oscillations

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Thursday December 12, 2019
Dr. Marc Pinsonneault
Ohio State university

Abstract

Time-domain space missions have revolutionized our understanding of stellar physics and stellar populations. Virtually all evolved stars can be detected as oscillators in missions such as Kepler, K2, TESS and PLATO.  Asteroseismology, or the study of stellar oscillations, can be combined with spectroscopy to infer masses, radii and ages for very large samples of stars.  This asteroseismic data can also be used to train machine learning tools to infer ages for even larger stellar population studies, sampling a large fraction of the volume of the Milky Way galaxy. In this talk I demonstrate that asteroseismic radii are in excellent agreement with those inferred using Gaia and spectroscopic data; this demonstrates that the current asteroseismic data is precise and accurate at the 1-2% level.  Major new catalogs for Kepler and K2 data are nearing completion, and I present initial results from both. We find unexpected age patterns in stars though to be chemically old, illustrating the power of age information for Galactic archeology.  Prospects for future progress in the TESS era will also be discussed.


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Tuesday April 29, 2014
Dr. Sergio Simon
IAC

Abstract

The application of the Fourier transform (FT) technique to high resolution spectra of OB-type stars has challenged our previous knowledge about stellar rotation in stars in the upper region of the HRD. The FT is an old and powerful tool that has being widely used in the case of cool stars, but only very recently applied to massive stars in a systematic way. In this talk I will present the results of the line-broadening characterization of ~250 Galactic OB-type stars (including dwarfs, giants and supergiants with spectral types O4-B9) from the IACOB spectroscopic database. I will show how these analyses have led to a downward revision of previously determined projected rotational velocities in these stars, and have definitely confirmed the presence of a non-negligible extra line-broadening contribution (commonly called macroturbulent broadening) in the whole OB star domain. I will also provide some notes about the importance of these findings on the evolution of massive stars and the detection of stellar oscillations along the lifetime of these important astrophysical objects.


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Thursday May 17, 2012
Mr. Yuri Cavecchi
Universiteit van Amsterdam

Abstract

I will review what we know about Type I Bursts (thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting Neutron Stars) and burst oscillations (fluctuations in the intensity of the burst lightcurves). I will describe the known problems in burst oscillation models and the various solutions that have been proposed. I will report recent progress made in the case of the pulsar IGR J17480-2446 in the Globular Cluster Terzan 5, where we were able to pin point the most likely mechanism responsible for the oscillations. I will explain whether this might be applicable to the other bursters and discuss future perspectives including current efforts to develop magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of the bursting process.


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Tuesday July 26, 2011
Dr. Katrien Uytterhoeven
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

The Kepler spacecraft is providing photometric time series with micromagnitude precision for thousands of variable stars. The continuous time-series of unprecedented timespan open up the opportunity to study the pulsational variability in much more detail than was previously possible from the ground. We present a first general characterization of the variability of A-F type stars as observed in the Kepler light curves of a sample of 750 candidate variable A-F type stars, and investigate the relation between gamma Doradus, delta Scuti, and hybrid stars. Our results suggest a revision of the current observational instability strips, and imply an investigation of pulsation mechanisms to drive hybrid pulsations.


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Wednesday May 26, 2010
Dr. Katrien Uytterhoeven
Laboratoire AIM, IRFU/DSM/CEA, Saclay, France

Abstract

Gamma Dor stars (M = 1.2-2.5 M⊙; spectral type A-F) are very interesting from an asteroseismic point of view. They show gravity modes, which are the only modes that provide information on the deep stellar interior. Observationally they are very challenging targets. Typical pulsation periods are of the order of a day and amplitudes are fairly small (below 0.05 mag; 2 km/s), making it extremely difficult to monitor the periodic variations from the ground. The asteroseismic space missions CoRoT and Kepler are providing uninterrupted time-series from space, with unprecedented accuracy, and hence promise a revolution in the study of gamma Dor stars. I will present results of the seismic analysis of CoRoT and Kepler gamma Dor targets, and the associated ground-based support observations, involving many telescopes at different observatories (including La Palma and Izaña).

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