Found 3 talks width keyword protoplanetary discs

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Thursday March 10, 2016
Mr. Sergio Velasco Muñoz
IAC

Abstract

I will summarize the two well proved techniques for high spatial resolution: Lucky Imaging and Adaptive Optics and the work of our group in this field. I will also introduce the state-of-the-art new instrument Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI). On AOLI, both techniques merge providing a very versatile answer on the visible range. Some first science on the T-Tauri system LkHa 262/263 in the MBM 12 cloud will be reported together with a review of the next steps to be developed.


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Tuesday December 2, 2014
Prof. Tsevi Mazeh
Tel Aviv University

Abstract

The angle between the stellar spin axis and the orbital planetary angular momentum of a planet, also referred to as the obliquity of the system, is a matter of intense study in recent years, for the transiting planets of the Kepler mission in particular. Some evidence was found for two populations of hot Jupiters - one around cool stars with orbits well-aligned with the stellar rotational axes, and the other one around hot stars with isotropic distribution of obliquities, including planets with retrograde motion. It was suggested that the primordial planetary obliquity is isotropic, and cool stars have reached their zero-obliquity state by tidal re-alignment.

The talk will summarize the observational techniques for measuring planetary obliquities, and the different theoretical approaches to interpret this new, unexpected feature of exo-planet population. Finally, I will present a surprising statistical new result that emerges from the study of Kepler light curves of stellar rotation, suggesting the alignment of cool stars is probably not the result of tidal interaction.


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Friday May 24, 2013
Prof. Charles Telesco
University of Florida

Abstract

CanariCam is the GTC multi-mode mid-IR camera developed by the University of Florida. CanariCam commissioning began in earnest in
 mid-2012, and is still in progress. However, during that time it was also possible to begin science observations. After commenting on
 the current status of CanariCam, I will present some highlights of these early science observations, with an emphasis on those of protoplanetary disks. These data are still being analyzed and interpreted, so my comments will be preliminary. However, they demonstrate that CanariCam is an outstanding instrument that can provide valuable insight into a variety of astrophysical processes. CanariCam's polarimetric mode is particularly unique, and I will show intriguing science results that may indicate the magnetic-field distribution
in a YSO outflow and in massive disks and their environments. I am presenting these results on behalf of the CanariCam Science Team, many of whom have contributed significantly to the early progress with CanariCam.


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