Found 51 talks archived in Planetary systems

Muinonen2_161108s
Tuesday November 8, 2016
Dr. Karri Muinonen
University of Helsinki, Finland

Abstract

Series: XXVIII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Solar System Exploration

Topic: Physical Properties of Asteroid Surfaces

Lecture 2: Novel spectrometric modeling

In his second talk, Dr. Muinonen focuses on multiple scattering, describing in detail processes such as the radiative transfer and coherent backscattering (RT-CB), particular cases with incoherent fields, and radiative transfer with reciprocal transactions (R2T2). He also presents very preliminar and recent results obtained by his team at the University of Finland on incoherent backscattering experimetns on millions of spherical particles. In this talk he also revisits space weathering in the context of radiative transfer theory and presents some experiments carried out with olivine.  


Lebonnois2_161108s
Tuesday November 8, 2016
Dr. Sebastien Lebonnois
Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, France

Abstract

Series: XXVIII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Solar System Exploration

Topic: Planetary Atmospheres.

Lecture 2: Radiative transfer, composition, and clouds. 

In his second lecture Dr. Lebonnois talks about the processes that take place in the atmosphere of the planets, explaining the energy balance between the different layers, and the interaction with the surface. The generation of spectral lines and bands, the creation of clouds, and the characteristics of temperature profiles are also described with detail. 


Kuppers1_161107s
Monday November 7, 2016
Dr. Michael Küppers
European Space Astronomy Centre, Spain

Abstract

Series: XXVIII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Solar System Exploration

Topic: Cometary Science and the Rosetta Mission.

Lecture 1: Comets and the Rosetta mission. 

Dr. Küppers gives a general overview on comets in the context of the formation of the Solar System, describing their physical, dynamical, and compositional properties. The speaker describes cometary missions that have been sent before the Rosetta mission and lists some of the most important cometary science questions that are still unsolved or under debated.


Muinonen1_161107s
Monday November 7, 2016
Dr. Karri Muinonen
University of Helsinki, Finland

Abstract

Series: XXVIII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Solar System Exploration

Topic: Physical Properties of Asteroid Surfaces

Lecture 1: Introduction to asteroid UV-VIS-NIR spectrometry

In this first talk, Dr. Muinonen gives an introduction to polarimetry, photometry, and spectropolarimetry techniques and their application to the study of asteroid surfaces. The talk includes a description of the Shkuratov radiative transfer model and the use of Monte Carlo simulations to model radiative transfer for meteorite spectra. 


Stansberry1_161107s
Monday November 7, 2016
Dr. John Stansberry
Space Telescope Science Institute, USA

Abstract

Series: XXVIII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Solar System Exploration

Topic: Exploring the Outer Solar System

Lecture 1: TNOs: a brief history, dynamical structure, and characteristics of its inhabitants

This first talk is devoted to provide an overview of the current state of the population of minor bodies beyond the orbit of Neptune. A review of the discovery history is given, as well as a description of the physical, compositionsl, and dynamical properties of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs), Pluto, and the Kuiper belt in general.


Lebonnois1_161107s
Monday November 7, 2016
Dr. Sebastien Lebonnois
Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, France

Abstract

Series: XXVIII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Solar System Exploration

Topic: Planetary Atmospheres.

Lecture 1: Overview of planetary atmospheres in the Solar System. 

In this lecture Dr. Lebonnois talks about the large diversity of objects that populate our Solar System, gives an overview on the different types of atmospheres that can be found, as well as the atmospheric structures, and ends with an update on the current exploration of planetary atmospheres. 


nestor_espinoza_150709s
Thursday July 9, 2015
Mr. Néstor Espinoza
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Abstract

One of the most exciting possibilities enabled by transiting exoplanets is to measure their atmospheric properties through the technique of transmission spectroscopy: the variation of the transit depth as a function of wavelength due to starlight interacting with the atmosphere of the exoplanet. Motivated by the need of optical transmission spectra of exoplanets, we recently launched the Arizona-CfA-Católica Exoplanet Spectroscopy Survey (ACCESS), which aims at studying the atmospheres of ~20 exoplanets ranging from super-Earths to hot-Jupiters in the entire optical atmospheric window using ground-based facilities. In this talk, I will present the survey, the astrostatistical challenges it poses and first results.


hannu_parviainen_150210s
Tuesday February 10, 2015
Dr. Hannu Parviainen
University of Oxford

Abstract

Detection and characterisation of weak periodic signals from noisy time series is a common problem in many different fields of astrophysics. Here I detail one approach for testing whether a signal with roughly known characteristics exists in the data, using a search of secondary eclipses from Kepler-observed photometric time series as an example. The method is based on Bayesian model selection and uses Gaussian processes to model the stochastic variability in the data in non-parametric fashion.


tsevi_mazeh_141202s
Tuesday December 2, 2014
Prof. Tsevi Mazeh
Tel Aviv University

Abstract

The angle between the stellar spin axis and the orbital planetary angular momentum of a planet, also referred to as the obliquity of the system, is a matter of intense study in recent years, for the transiting planets of the Kepler mission in particular. Some evidence was found for two populations of hot Jupiters - one around cool stars with orbits well-aligned with the stellar rotational axes, and the other one around hot stars with isotropic distribution of obliquities, including planets with retrograde motion. It was suggested that the primordial planetary obliquity is isotropic, and cool stars have reached their zero-obliquity state by tidal re-alignment.

The talk will summarize the observational techniques for measuring planetary obliquities, and the different theoretical approaches to interpret this new, unexpected feature of exo-planet population. Finally, I will present a surprising statistical new result that emerges from the study of Kepler light curves of stellar rotation, suggesting the alignment of cool stars is probably not the result of tidal interaction.


sara_seager_141023s
Thursday October 23, 2014
Prof. Sara Seager
MIT

Abstract

The discovery and characterization of exoplanets have the potential to offer the world one of the most impactful findings ever in the history of astronomy?the identification of life beyond Earth. Life can be inferred by the presence of atmospheric biosignature gases? Gases produced by life that can accumulate to detectable levels in an exoplanet atmosphere. Detection will be made by remote sensing by sophisticated space telescopes. The conviction that biosignature gases will actually be detected in the future is moderated by lessons learned from the dozens of exoplanet atmospheres studied in last decade, namely the difficulty in robustly identifying molecules, the possible interference of clouds, and the permanent limitations from a spectrum of spatially unresolved and globally mixed gases without direct surface observations. The vision for the path to assess the presence of life beyond Earth is being established.