Found 10 talks width keyword planets

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Tuesday November 8, 2016
Dr. Sebastien Lebonnois
Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, France

Abstract

Series: XXVIII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Solar System Exploration

Topic: Planetary Atmospheres.

Lecture 2: Radiative transfer, composition, and clouds. 

In his second lecture Dr. Lebonnois talks about the processes that take place in the atmosphere of the planets, explaining the energy balance between the different layers, and the interaction with the surface. The generation of spectral lines and bands, the creation of clouds, and the characteristics of temperature profiles are also described with detail. 


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Monday November 7, 2016
Dr. Alejandro Cardesín
European Space Astronomy Centre, Spain

Abstract

Series: XXVIII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Solar System Exploration

Topic: Exploration of the Solar System by the European Space Agency

Lecture 1: Overview of ESA Solar System Missions 

Dr. Cardesin introduces in this talk the European Space Agency, describing the agency's structure, budget, and activites. Particular atention is paid to the ESA Science Program and to the role of ESAC (Madrid), with a description of all past, present, and future space missions in which the ESA has been/is/will be involved related to Solar System exploration.


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Monday November 7, 2016
Dr. Sebastien Lebonnois
Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, France

Abstract

Series: XXVIII Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Solar System Exploration

Topic: Planetary Atmospheres.

Lecture 1: Overview of planetary atmospheres in the Solar System. 

In this lecture Dr. Lebonnois talks about the large diversity of objects that populate our Solar System, gives an overview on the different types of atmospheres that can be found, as well as the atmospheric structures, and ends with an update on the current exploration of planetary atmospheres. 


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Thursday July 9, 2015
Mr. Néstor Espinoza
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Abstract

One of the most exciting possibilities enabled by transiting exoplanets is to measure their atmospheric properties through the technique of transmission spectroscopy: the variation of the transit depth as a function of wavelength due to starlight interacting with the atmosphere of the exoplanet. Motivated by the need of optical transmission spectra of exoplanets, we recently launched the Arizona-CfA-Católica Exoplanet Spectroscopy Survey (ACCESS), which aims at studying the atmospheres of ~20 exoplanets ranging from super-Earths to hot-Jupiters in the entire optical atmospheric window using ground-based facilities. In this talk, I will present the survey, the astrostatistical challenges it poses and first results.


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Tuesday December 2, 2014
Prof. Tsevi Mazeh
Tel Aviv University

Abstract

The angle between the stellar spin axis and the orbital planetary angular momentum of a planet, also referred to as the obliquity of the system, is a matter of intense study in recent years, for the transiting planets of the Kepler mission in particular. Some evidence was found for two populations of hot Jupiters - one around cool stars with orbits well-aligned with the stellar rotational axes, and the other one around hot stars with isotropic distribution of obliquities, including planets with retrograde motion. It was suggested that the primordial planetary obliquity is isotropic, and cool stars have reached their zero-obliquity state by tidal re-alignment.

The talk will summarize the observational techniques for measuring planetary obliquities, and the different theoretical approaches to interpret this new, unexpected feature of exo-planet population. Finally, I will present a surprising statistical new result that emerges from the study of Kepler light curves of stellar rotation, suggesting the alignment of cool stars is probably not the result of tidal interaction.


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Thursday January 23, 2014
Mr. Alejandro Suárez
Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias

Abstract

The discovery of earth-like planets is nowadays the main goal of the entire exoplanets field. Despite the recent success of transiting programs, the measurement of radial velocities (RV) is still the most powerful method to find them. M-Dwarfs, given their low masses, and close-in habitable zone have become the perfect targets for the current generation of spectrographs. In this talk I will present our own M-Dwarfs RV program here at the IAC, explaining our methods, goals, difficulties and preliminary results.


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Thursday February 7, 2013
Dr. Simon Albrecht
MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research

Abstract

Spectroscopic observations of stars do not only provide us with valuable information about the stars themselves, but over the last years such observations have lead to numerous exoplanet discoveries and new insights into planet formation. One important clue emerged at the dawn of the field: the existence of hot Jupiters, gas giants with orbital distances much smaller than an astronomical unit. We and other groups found some of these planets orbiting their stars on highly inclined or even retrograde orbits. I show how the orientation of the stellar axis in relation to the orbital plane (obliquity) reveals the mechanism by which these planets move inwards. Similar measurements in multiple transiting planet systems, with smaller planets will further enhance our understanding of the formation and evolution of planetary systems. In order to take those measurements we need to improve the way we analyze spectra. I present recent results obtained with such a new technique. These include multiple planet systems and results from my "BANANA" survey of close binaries, some of which, such as DI Herculis, also show strong misalignment. The same technique will allow for a reduction of stellar noise in radial velocity surveys, improving our ability to search for smaller, more Earth like planets around bright nearby stars.


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Thursday October 25, 2012
Prof. Monica M. Grady
Open University, Milton Keynes, UK

Abstract

Traditionally, astronomers study stars and planets by telescope. But we can also learn about them by using a microscope – through studying meteorites. From meteorites, we can learn about the processes and materials that shaped the Solar System and our planet. Tiny grains within meteorites have come from other stars, giving information about the stellar neighbourhood in which the Sun was born.

Meteorites are fragments of ancient material, natural objects that survive their fall to Earth from space. Some are metallic, but most are made of stone. They are the oldest objects that we have for study. Almost all meteorites are fragments from asteroids, and were formed at the birth of the Solar System, approximately 4570 million years ago. They show a compositional variation that spans a whole range of planetary materials, from completely unmelted and unfractionated stony chondrites to highly fractionated and differentiated iron meteorites. Meteorites, and components within them, carry records of all stages of Solar System history. There are also meteorites from the Moon and from Mars that give us insights to how these bodies have formed and evolved.

In her lecture, Monica will describe how the microscope is another tool that can be employed to trace stellar and planetary processes.


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Monday October 22, 2012
Dr. Seigo Miyamoto, Dr. Valeri Tioukov
ERI, University of Tokyo, Japan
INFN, Napoli, Italy

Abstract

The origin and structure of the Earth's crust is still a major question. Current measurements of the nearby crust are based largely on seismic, gravimetric and electrical  techniques. In this talk, we introduce a novel method based on cosmic-ray muons to create a direct snapshot of the density profile within a volcano (and/or other geological features).  By measuring the muon
absorption along the different paths through an object (volcano, mountain, a fault, ...), one can deduce the density profile within the object. The major feature of this
technique makes possible for us to perform a tomographic measurement by placing two or more cosmic ray detection
systems around the object. Another strong point of this technique is the possibility to carry out fulltime monitoring, since  muons are incessantly arriving, recalling they are
the most numerous energetic charged particles at sea level.


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Tuesday March 30, 2010
Dr. Iván Ramírez
Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Germany

Abstract

It has been recently shown that the chemical composition of the Sun is anomalous when compared to most nearby stars of very similar fundamental parameters, so-called solar twins. Compared to these stars, the Sun is deficient in refractory elements relative to volatiles, a finding that we speculate is a signature of the terrestrial planet formation that occurred around the Sun but not in the majority of solar twins. I will discuss these and newer related results, the strengths and weaknesses of our planet formation interpretation, as well as our plans for future observations that can help us better understand the nature of the abundance trends found.


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