Found 12 talks width keyword spectrographs

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Tuesday February 19, 2019
Dr. Hans Zinnecker
Deutsches SOFIA Institut, Univ. of Stuttgart, Germany (retired)

Abstract

 

SOFIA, short for Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy,
is a 2.7m telescope flying on a Boeing 747SP at altitudes of 12-14km,
to detect and study mid- and far-infrared radiation that is blocked
by water vapor in the earth's atmosphere and cannot reach the
ground. It is the successor to the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (1974-1995)
and currently the only access to and platform for astronomical observations
in the far-infrared (30-300 microns), except for balloon-borne telescopes.
 
SOFIA normally flies out of California, but once a year also
deploys to the Southern Hemisphere (usually to Christchurch,
New Zealand), benefitting from the excellent wintertime
stratospheric conditions to study the rich southern skies.
Although a bilateral project (80:20)
between USA (NASA/USRA) and Germany (DLR/DSI), it is open for
proposals from the world-wide astronomical community at large.
It addresses many science questions that ESA's successful but
now extinct Herschel Observatory has left unanswered and
offers observational opportunities similar to and beyond Herschel.
SOFIA also has many synergies with ALMA and APEX, as well as IRAM
and other submm and radio telescopes.

In part I of this SOFIA lecture, I will introduce the observatory 
in general, the plane, the telescope, the mode of operation, and 
in particular the current and future instrumentation.

In part II (later this week),  I will present a glimpse of SOFIA science
highlights and discoveries in its first 6 years of operation
(since 2012), including the most recent astrophysical and astrochemical 
results. I will also address its future ISM and star formation potential.  

SOFIA is a unique observatory, different from ground-based and
space platforms, which will serve the mid- and far-infrared 
astronomical community for many years to come.
 
It is a fascinating experience to fly on SOFIA! 


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Tuesday January 8, 2019
Dr. Johan Knapen
IAC

Abstract

We present the discovery of a small 0.2'' (60 pc) radius kinematically decoupled core, as well as an outflow jet, in the archetypical AGN-starburst "composite" galaxy NGC 7130 from integral field data obtained with the adaptive optics-assisted MUSE-NFM instrument on the VLT. Correcting the already good natural seeing at the time of our science verification observations with the four-laser GALACSI AO system we reach an unprecedented spatial resolution of around 0.15''. We confirm the existence of star-forming knots arranged in an 0.58'' (185 pc) radius ring around the nucleus, previously observed from UV and optical  Hubble Space Telescope and CO(6-5) ALMA imaging. We determine the position of the nucleus as the location of a peak in gas velocity dispersion. A plume of material extends towards the NE from the nucleus until at least the edge of our FOV at 2'' (640 pc) radius which we interpret as an outflow jet originating in the AGN. The plume is not visible morphologically, but is clearly characterised in our data by emission lines ratios characteristic of AGN emission, enhanced gas velocity dispersion, and distinct non-circular gas velocities. Its orientation is roughly perpendicular to line of nodes of the rotating host galaxy disk. An 0.2''-radius circumnuclear area of positive and negative velocities indicates a tiny inner disk, which can only be seen after combining the integral field spectroscopic capabilities of MUSE with adaptive optics.


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Thursday September 6, 2018
Prof. Klaus-Peter Schroder
Universidad de Guanajuato

Abstract

Tigre is a 1.2m f:8 RC robotic telescope designed to do spectroscopic monitoring of dynamical processes, mainly in stellar astrophysics, for objects of less than 2" of size and brighter than magnitude 10...11. Its 2-channel (red/blue) echelle spectrograph HEROS has a resolution of 20,000 and covers simultaneously almost the whole range from the near IR to near UV (8800-3800A). It can also be used to determine the exact physical properties of stellar samples of interest, comparing high s/n (80-120) spectra with PHOENIX models and iSpec analysis. The large amount of spectroscopic data ideally serves a large variety of undergraduate and graduate thesis projects. This presentation gives a brief insight into this dedicated, yet economic international project of the universities of Hamburg, Guanajuato and Liege and the opportunities it has to offer to the international community.


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Thursday April 24, 2014
Mr. Antonio Manescau
ESO Garching

Abstract

MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a 2nd generation Integral Field facility for the VLT. With a field of view of 1x1 arcmin, fine sampling, intermediate spectral resolution and large spectral coverage in the visible, it uses a complex image slicer, twenty-four parallel spectrographs and a large detector area. In addition, MUSE is conceived to work assisted by the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF), which will enhance notably its performance. MUSE is the result of ten years of design and development by the MUSE consortium — headed by the Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, France and the partner institutes Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP, Germany),  Institut für Astrophysik Göttingen (IAG, Germany),  Institute for Astronomy ETH Zurich (Switzerland), L'Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (IRAP, France), Nederlandse Onderzoekschool voor de Astronomie (NOVA, the Netherlands) and ESO.
MUSE has been successfully installed on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT). In this talk it will be presented the instrument, its design and challenges, the integration (both in Europe and Paranal), the first light and first commissioning results.


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Thursday November 29, 2012
Dr. Klaus Gerhard Puschmann
Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, Germany

Abstract

The GREGOR Fabry-Pérot Interferometer (GFPI) is one of the first-light post-focus instruments for the German 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope at the Observatorio del Teide. The GFPI is a tunable dual-etalon system in collimated mounting that allows fast narrow-band imaging. It is designed for spectrometric and spectropolarimetric observations between 530-860 nm and 580-660 nm, respectively, and has a theoretical spectral resolution of about 250,000. The field-of-view in spectroscopic mode is 50" x 38" (25" x 38" in case of Stokes-vector spectropolarimetry). In combination with post-facto image reconstruction it has the potential for discovery science concerning the dynamic Sun and its magnetic field at spatial scales down to about 50 km. The instrument underwent an extended commissioning in 2011 and careful science verification throughout 2012. In this talk I will summarize the main characteristics of the GFPI and present results from both the science verification and first observational campaigns. In addition, I will layout the design of the planned BLue Imaging Solar Spectrometer (BLISS), a second Fabry-Pérot Interferometer for the wavelength range 380-530 nm. I will discuss how both the GFPI and BLISS can be used to extend our knowledge on the structure of sunspots and the solar chromosphere by presenting details to the current state of knowledge on these two topics and by outlining possible improvements.


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Tuesday October 16, 2012
Dr. José Antonio Caballero
Centro de Astrobiologia (CAB)

Abstract

CARMENES (Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exoearths with Near-infrared and optical Échelle Spectrographs) is a next-generation instrument being built for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory by a consortium of German and Spanish institutions. It consists of two separated spectrographs covering the wavelength ranges from 0.5 to 1.0 mum and from 1.0 to 1.7 mum with spectral resolutions R = 82,000, each of which shall perform high-accuracy radial-velocity measurements (~1 m/s) with long-term stability. The fundamental science objective of CARMENES is to carry out a survey of ~300 late-type main-sequence stars with the goal of detecting low-mass planets in their habitable zones. We aim at being able to detect 2 MEarth planets in the habitable zone of M5V stars. The CARMENES first light is expected to occur in Spring 2014.


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Monday September 12, 2011
Dr. Marc Balcells
Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Spain

Abstract

The vision for the use of the WHT in the coming decade is taking shape.   A key element is the construction and deployment of WEAVE, a wide-field massive-multiplex spectrograph.  With 1000 fibres and spectral resolutions of 5000 and 20000, the opportunities for discovery are tremendous.  Three key fields will be: Milky-Way and Local Group archaeology linked to the   Gaia mission; cosmology redshift surveys; and galaxy evolution studies linked to photometric surveys such as VISTA, UKIDSS, LOFAR, EUCLID, and  others. IAC has the opportunity to get involved in this important instrument for ORM from the beginning.


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Thursday July 21, 2011
Dr. Peter Weilbacher
Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics, Postdam, Germany

Abstract

The 2nd generation VLT instrument Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer(MUSE) is going to be an integral field spectrograph with wide field of view and high spatial sampling. It is currently being built by a European consortium to see first light end of 2012. I will describe instrumental properties, show some details of the optomechanical design, present the data processing, and give some examples for possible scientific use.


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Thursday June 9, 2011
Dr. Peter Hammserley
ESO, Graching, Germany

Abstract

VIMOS is visible multi-object spectrometer operating on the VLT.  The high multiplex of the VLT visible imager and multi object/integral-field spectrometer, VIMOS, makes it a powerful instrument for large-scale spectroscopic surveys of faint sources. Following community input and recommendations by ESO's Science and Technology Committee, it was decided to upgrade the instrument in phases. The first phase of the upgrade is described and included changing the shutters, installing an active flexure compensation system, replacing the detectors with CCDs with a far better red sensitivity and less fringing, and improving the data reduction pipeline.


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Wednesday September 23, 2009
Dr. Lisa Mazzuca
NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, USA

Abstract

The Hubble Space Telescope has been given new life with the successful Servicing Mission 4 (SM4). The goal of each servicing mission to the telescope has been to replace instruments and other system components that would enable better science productivity and enlightenment. But never before has the notion of repairing existing broken instruments in the telescope been considered because of the complexity of such an activity... until now. During SM4, two new scientific instruments were installed – the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3); two failed instruments, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), were brought back to life by the first ever on-orbit repairs; and, the spacecraft original batteries were replaced with new ones that will keep HST powered well into the next decade. But what will the scientific observations look like? The evidence is here with the release of the early observations from each instrument, and the news is wonderful!

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