Found 18 talks width keyword Grantecan, GTC

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Wednesday November 2, 2011
Dr. Philippe Feautrier
Lab d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire de Grenoble, France

Abstract

The success of the next generation of instruments for 8 to 40-m class telescopes will depend on the ability of Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to provide excellent image quality and stability. This will be achieved by increasing the sampling, wavelength range and correction quality of the wave front error in both spatial and time domains. The modern generation of AO wavefront sensor detectors started in the late nineties with the development of the CCD50 detector by e2v under ESO contract for the ESO NAOS AO system. With a 128x128 pixels format, this 8 outputs CCD runs at a 500 Hz frame rate with a readout noise of 7e-. A major breakthrough has been achieved with the recent development of the CCD220, also by e2v technologies. This 240x240 pixels 8 outputs EMCCD (CCD with internal multiplication) has been jointly funded by ESO and Europe under the FP6 programme. The CCD220 detector and the OCAM2 camera are now the most sensitive system in the world for advanced adaptive optics systems, offering an astonishing <0.2 e readout noise at a frame rate of 1500 Hz with negligible dark current. Extremely easy to operate, OCAM2 only needs a 24 V power supply and a modest water cooling circuit. This system will be extensively described in this talk. An upgrade of OCAM2 is foreseen to boost its frame rate to 2500 Hz, opening the window of XAO wavefront sensing for the ELT. Since this major success, new developments started in Europe. One is fully dedicated to Laser Guide Star AO for the ELT with an ESO involvment. The spot elongation from a LGS SH wavefront sensor induces an increase of the pixel format. Two detectors are currently developed by e2v. The NGSD will be a 672x672 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 4e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. The LGSD is a scaling of the NGSD with 1680x1680 pixels and 3 e readout noise (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. New technologies will be developed for that purpose: new CMOS pixel architecture, CMOS back thinned and back illuminated device, full digital outputs. In addition, the CMOS technology is extremely robust in a telescope environment. Both detectors will be used on the ELT, depending on the AO system considered. Additional developments also started for wavefront sensing in the infrared based on new breakthrough using ultra low noise Avalanche Photodiode (APD) arrays within the RAPID project. The latter should offer a 320x240 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3.2 microns, with 2 e readout noise at 1500 Hz frame rate. First results of this project will be showed.


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Monday June 21, 2010
Prof. Craig McKay
Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, UK

Abstract

A new method of imaging in the visible has given the highest resolution images ever taken anywhere. It needs a natural guide star of only 18.5 mag (I band). This talk will show how it can be done on the WHT, the VLT and even on the GTC.

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Tuesday June 15, 2010
Dr. Rainier Schödel
Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Spain

Abstract

I will present a short introduction to speckle imaging and the so-called speckle holography technique. Subsequently, I will present results of speckle observations with the VLT (NACO) and Keck (NIRC) telescopes. The experiments demonstrate that in the observed targets speckle imaging combined with holographic image reconstruction provides imaging quality that can compete with and even supersede current adaptive optics (AO) imaging systems. Speckle imaging is a way to achieve reliable, high-quality, diffraction limited imaging capacity at relatively low costs. I will discuss what would be the estimated performance of speckle cameras at the WHT and GTC and sketch possible concepts.

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Friday April 16, 2010
Dr. Alessandro Ederoclite
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

I present the online and the offline data reduction system for OSIRIS, the optical multi-mode instrument for GranTeCan. The software is written in Python and invokes PyRAF tasks which have been optimized for the instrument. I review the characteristics of the instrument and of the software. I will also present the improvements which are foreseen for the software.

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Thursday January 28, 2010
Dr. Nicolas Lodieu
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

In this Breaking News seminar, I will describe our project dedicated to the search for ultracool low-metallicity dwarfs (or subdwarfs) in the large-scale databases. The highlight of the seminar is the discovery of a mid-L subdwarf, the fifth known to date, and the first one identified in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The spectroscopic nature of this subdwarf was confirmed with data obtained with GTC/OSIRIS in April 2009.

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Wednesday March 11, 2009
Dr. Jordi Cepa
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

The standard scientific operations of the instrument OSIRIS will start at the GTC by mid March. The first tests of the instrument once mounted on the telescope are now finished and during this talk we will show the results of the instrument characterization and final performance. We will present the plans for the future commissioning of the remaining observing modes as well as the next implementations expected for OSIRIS.


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Tuesday September 23, 2008
Dr. Peter Hammersley
Grantecan, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

This talk presents the current status of the commissioning of the GTC. It covers the progress made since first light, the current performance and then looks ahead to what is expected between now and the start of science operations in March.


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Thursday September 18, 2008
Dr. Francisco Prada
Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Spain

Abstract

SIDE (Super Ifu Deployable Experiment) is being proposed as a new instrument for the GTC 10.4m telescope on La Palma. It will be a wide-field fiber-fed spectrograph of intermediate resolution, highly efficient in multi-object and 3D spectroscopy. SIDE will feature the unique possibility of performing simultaneous visible and NIR observations for selected spectral ranges. SIDE will produce unique data sets and open new opportunities to understand our view on galaxy formation and evolution and it will provide new insights on the physics of the dark universe. In this talk I will give a brief instrument overview and review the status of SIDE and its pathfinder, the mini SIDE. The SIDE project is lead by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia in Granada (Spain).


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