Found 16 talks width keyword Grantecan, GTC

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Friday February 12, 2021
Prof. Caroline Kulcsár
Université Paris-Saclay

Abstract

In this talk, I will start by briefly presenting the Institut d'Optique Graduate School and the Laboratoire Charles Fabry, where I conduct my research. Then I will explain the principle of adaptive optics and discuss some issues related to the control of AO systems. This will lead to the general ideas behind high-performance control. In particular, I will explain why high-performance control can outperform the standard integrator. Some results of on-sky experiments will be shown, and I will conclude the talk by presenting our PhD students working through research collaborations.

 

 


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Friday January 29, 2021
Dr. Jorge Sánchez-Capuchino
IAC

Abstract

Al objeto de incrementar la cobertura de cielo proporcionada por el sistema de óptica adaptativa de GTC, durante los últimos 4 años se ha estado trabajando en la incorporación de un sistema de estrella guía láser de Sodio. A través de esta charla se repasará el estado actual del proyecto enfatizando aquellos aspectos relacionados con el sistema óptico de lanzamiento de la estrella guía. 

 


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Friday December 11, 2020
María F. Gómez Reñasco
IAC

Abstract

HORUS (High ResolUtion Spectrograph) es un espectrógrafo de alta resolución, instrumento visitante en GTC y disponible para la comunicad científica desde prinicipios de 2019. Instalado en la plataforma Nasmyth B, detrás de OSIRIS, comparte foco con él. En esta charla se describe su software de control, resaltando la implementación realizada para ser un instrumento visitante de GTC y cómo se ha resuelto el problema del apuntado de un objeto.


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Tuesday September 29, 2020
Dr. Felipe Murgas
IAC

Abstract

The formation and evolution of planets in general is closely linked to the life of their host star. What happens to the planetary systems at the end stages of the life cycle of their star has been one of the questions that have received attention from a theoretical point of view but has had a lack of real life examples to study. Among more than 4000 known exoplanets to date only a few of these objects have been found orbiting around pulsars, but so far we have found nothing that resembles what our own solar system will be like long after the Sun leaves the main sequence.

In this talk we will discuss the recent announcement by A. Vanderburg et al. of a giant planet candidate detected by the transit method orbiting around a white dwarf. The candidate was discovered using data from the space-based NASA mission TESS and confirmed using GTC, Spitzer, and other ground-based facilities. We will talk about the role that GTC played in this discovery, the peculiarity of this candidate system, and the possibility of detecting atmospheres in rocky planets orbiting around white dwarfs.

Zoom link: https://rediris.zoom.us/j/95796802777
Youtube link: https://youtu.be/TX5KfTeJNAM


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Thursday December 3, 2015
Dr. Domenico Bonaccini Calia
Job Manager for the LGS Systems Research and Development at ESO

Abstract

In collaboration with member states institutes, the use of the synergies with ESO is producing first important results in the R&D for Laser Guide Star adaptive optics, to be used for the large and extremely large telescope projects.


In this talk we will report on the preliminary results of the current campaign on LGS return flux with laser guide stars at Observatorio de el Teide and the foreseen tests of the EELT LGS-AO scheme, to be done at the WHT starting in summer 2016. An outlook will be given on the proposal for further feasibility tests at WHT in 2018-19, to experiment novel LGS-AO schemes using uplink beam correction and pyramid wavefront sensing. The demonstration is for a LGS-AO scheme giving high Strehl on the EELT and adaptive optics in the visible on 8m class telescopes.


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Tuesday May 19, 2015
Dr. Enrique Lopez Rodriguez
Universidad de Texas en San Antonio

Abstract

Little is known about the mid-infrared (MIR) polarization at high-angular resolution of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), however, the polarimetric mode of CanariCam on the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS has opened a new window to reveal its core. We have found a variety of results: 1) A Highly polarized synchrotron emission in the core of Cygnus A; 2) a very complex MIR polarization structures in and around the core of NGC 1068; and 3) a very low polarized core of Mrk 231. In this talk, I will present new CanariCam polarimetric results on several AGN which provide key information on our understanding of the AGN structure and jet formation.


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Thursday April 30, 2015
Dr. Gianluca Lombardi
GTC

Abstract

In the past years, intensive Site Characterization campaigns have been performed to chose the sites for the future giant ELTs. Various atmospheric turbulence profilers with different resolution and sensed altitude ranges have been used, as well as climatological tools and satellite data analysis. Mixing long term statistics at low altitude resolution with high resolution data collected during short term campaigns allows to produce the reference profiles as input to the Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument performance estimators. In this talk I will perform a brief review of the principal and most used instruments and tools in order to give to the audience a panorama of the work and the efforts to monitor the atmospheric turbulence for astronomical purposes.


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Monday October 13, 2014
Dr. Alastair Basden
Durham University

Abstract

Adaptive optics systems rely on a real-time control system which is responsible for receiving wavefront sensor information and computing and applying the necessary correction to the deformable mirrors. Historically, real-time control systems have relied on customised hardware comprised of multiple FPGA and DSP systems, which high complexity. More recently it has been demonstrated that conventional PCs are now sufficiently powerful to to perform this task. In this talk, I will present an open-source real-time control system, DARC, discuss its implementation on the CANARY AO system at the William Herschel Telescope, and cover the algorithms available. Extension to ELT-scale operation will be discussed, including hardware and detector considerations. The internal architecture of this modular system will be presented, with a case being made for its suitability for implementation on any AO system type, on any telescope.


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Wednesday November 2, 2011
Dr. Philippe Feautrier
Lab d'Astrophysique de l'Observatoire de Grenoble, France

Abstract

The success of the next generation of instruments for 8 to 40-m class telescopes will depend on the ability of Adaptive Optics (AO) systems to provide excellent image quality and stability. This will be achieved by increasing the sampling, wavelength range and correction quality of the wave front error in both spatial and time domains. The modern generation of AO wavefront sensor detectors started in the late nineties with the development of the CCD50 detector by e2v under ESO contract for the ESO NAOS AO system. With a 128x128 pixels format, this 8 outputs CCD runs at a 500 Hz frame rate with a readout noise of 7e-. A major breakthrough has been achieved with the recent development of the CCD220, also by e2v technologies. This 240x240 pixels 8 outputs EMCCD (CCD with internal multiplication) has been jointly funded by ESO and Europe under the FP6 programme. The CCD220 detector and the OCAM2 camera are now the most sensitive system in the world for advanced adaptive optics systems, offering an astonishing <0.2 e readout noise at a frame rate of 1500 Hz with negligible dark current. Extremely easy to operate, OCAM2 only needs a 24 V power supply and a modest water cooling circuit. This system will be extensively described in this talk. An upgrade of OCAM2 is foreseen to boost its frame rate to 2500 Hz, opening the window of XAO wavefront sensing for the ELT. Since this major success, new developments started in Europe. One is fully dedicated to Laser Guide Star AO for the ELT with an ESO involvment. The spot elongation from a LGS SH wavefront sensor induces an increase of the pixel format. Two detectors are currently developed by e2v. The NGSD will be a 672x672 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 4e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. The LGSD is a scaling of the NGSD with 1680x1680 pixels and 3 e readout noise (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate. New technologies will be developed for that purpose: new CMOS pixel architecture, CMOS back thinned and back illuminated device, full digital outputs. In addition, the CMOS technology is extremely robust in a telescope environment. Both detectors will be used on the ELT, depending on the AO system considered. Additional developments also started for wavefront sensing in the infrared based on new breakthrough using ultra low noise Avalanche Photodiode (APD) arrays within the RAPID project. The latter should offer a 320x240 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3.2 microns, with 2 e readout noise at 1500 Hz frame rate. First results of this project will be showed.


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Monday June 21, 2010
Prof. Craig McKay
Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, UK

Abstract

A new method of imaging in the visible has given the highest resolution images ever taken anywhere. It needs a natural guide star of only 18.5 mag (I band). This talk will show how it can be done on the WHT, the VLT and even on the GTC.

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