Found 12 talks width keyword outflows

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Thursday June 17, 2021
José Eduardo Méndez Delgado
IAC

Abstract

We present some results on a project based on high-resolution UVES@VLT spectroscopy and HST imaging of photoionized Herbig-Haro (HH) objects in the Orion Nebula. We study physical conditions, chemical abundances and other properties such as proper motions and the origin of the driving jets. Our study will include at least 9 HH objets, of which we will focus on HH529II, HH529III and HH204 in this talk. Our data allow us to separate the spectrum of the outflows from the main nebular emission, studying each object with an unprecedented detail. The HHs are located at different distances from the main ionization source of the Orion Nebula, with different ionization/physical conditions and flow velocities. In all objects, the electronic density (ne) is substantially higher than in the surrounding Orion Nebula, while the electronic temperature (Te) is maintained under photoionization equilibrium for the most abundant ion stages. In HH204 we observe a Te([OIII]) gradient due to the contribution of [OIII] emission from the cooling layer behind the bow shock, which is also detected in the HST imaging. The ionization degree of the gas in the different HH objects is very different, allowing us to determine the chemical composition of the Orion Nebula under both ionization conditions, avoiding the use of ionization correction factors (ICFs) for many elements. HH204 shows an abundance discrepancy  -the difference between abundances derived from recombination and collisionally excited lines- thas is actually zero. We find direct evidence of dust destruction in the bow shock in all objects. This increases the gaseous abundances of Fe, Ni and Cr with respect to the Orion Nebula ones. We show that a failure to resolve the different kinematic components -as in a low spectral resolution spectrum- can lead to significant error in the determination of chemical abundances -40% underestimate of O in the case of HH204-, mainly due to incorrect estimation of the electron density.


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Thursday May 27, 2021
Dr. Manuela Bischetti
INAF/Trieste

Abstract

This talk will be dedicated to luminous (LBol~1E47 erg/s),
high-redshift quasars, which are ideal targets to investigate (i) feedback
from SMBHs, and (ii) the early growth phases of giant galaxies. I will
present evidence of  SMBH-driven outflows  at all Cosmic epochs, back to
the early Universe. These outflows involve all gas phases (molecular,
neutral, ionised) and extend on nuclear to galactic and circum-galactic
scales. I will report on the first systematic study of the molecular gas
properties in the host-galaxies of the most luminous quasars, fundamental
to probe the impact of SMBH feedback on the host-galaxy evolution. I will
show that luminous quasars pinpoint high-density sites where giant galaxies
assemble, and I will discuss the major contribution of mergers to the final
galaxy mass. To this aim, I will present a wealth of multi-wavelength (UV
to sub-millimeter) observations from the WISE/SDSS hyper-luminous quasars
survey  at z~2-5 (WISSH), and recent results from the ESO large program
XQR-30, the Ultimate X-SHOOTER Legacy Survey of Quasars at the Reionization
epoch.

 


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Thursday December 5, 2019
Prof. Raffaella Morganti
ASTRON, Netherlands

Abstract

Our view of the gas and its physical conditions in the central region of AGN has been enriched by the discover of fast and massive outflows of HI and molecular gas. These outflows can be driven by radiation/winds but also by the interaction of the radio plasma with the ISM. Understanding the origin and quantifying their impact requires to trace their location and derive their physical conditions (density of the gas, mass, mass outflow rate and kinetic energy of the outflow etc.). Particularly interesting has been the finding that in the first phase of their life, jet in radio galaxies can be particularly effective in driving such outflows. This crucial phase is at the heart of the idea of feedback, therefore particularly relevant for studying feedback in action.

 

In this talk, I will present some of the results we have obtained to trace jet-driven HI and molecular gas outflows down to scales ranging from hundred to tens of pc. The impact of low-power radio jets will be discussed and the comparison with the predictions from numerical simulations will also be presented.

Outflows of up to few hundred Msun/yr have been found in molecular gas using ALMA while the HI observed with VLBI is showing that the outflowing gas is clumpy as also predicted from numerical simulations. I will describe the kinematics of the gas and its conditions and the relevance they may have for feedback.    


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Tuesday June 27, 2017
Dr. Alicia López Oramas
Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias

Abstract

The improvement on the Imaging Air Cherenkov Technique led to the discovery of a new class of compact binaries: the gamma-ray binaries. This small class consist  of only five members, all of them composed by a massive star and a compact object. The nature of the compact object is unknown for all of them but PSR B1259-63, which contains a pulsar. It is crucial to study and monitor these systems not only to understand their behavior, the scenario accounting for the gamma-ray emission and their nature but also to comprehend why we have not detected more sources of this exclusive family. In this presentation, I will review the state-of-the-art of this field and I will present the observations performed with the MAGIC telescopes in order to unveil the nature of gamma-ray binaries.


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Tuesday October 6, 2015
Prof. Norbert Langer
Univ. of Bonn

Abstract

It is often assumed that when stars reach their Eddington limit, strong outflows are initiated, and that this happens only for extreme stellar
masses. I will show that in realistic models of stars up to 500 Msun, the Eddington limit is not reached at the stellar surface. Instead, I will argue that the Eddington limit is exceeded inside the stellar envelope, in hydrogen-rich stars above about 1 ... 30 Msun, and in Wolf-Rayet stars above 7 Msun, with drastic effects for their structure and stability. I will discuss the observational evidence for this, and outline evolutionary consequences.


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Thursday June 26, 2014
Prof. Clive Tadhunter
University of Sheffield

Abstract

There is increasing speculation that quasars are intimately linked to the evolution of their host galaxies. Not only are they triggered as galaxies build up mass through gas accretion, but they also have the potential to drive massive outflows that can directly affect galaxy evolution by heating the gas and expelling it from galaxy bulges. However, there remain considerable uncertainties about how, when and where quasars are triggered as galaxies evolve, and the true energetic significance for the quasar-induced outflows and their acceleration mechanism have yet to be established. In this talk I will present new Gemini, VLT, Spitzer and Herschel results on samples of luminous AGN in the local Universe which provide key information on the triggering mechanisms for quasars and physics of their outflows.


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Friday May 24, 2013
Prof. Charles Telesco
University of Florida

Abstract

CanariCam is the GTC multi-mode mid-IR camera developed by the University of Florida. CanariCam commissioning began in earnest in
 mid-2012, and is still in progress. However, during that time it was also possible to begin science observations. After commenting on
 the current status of CanariCam, I will present some highlights of these early science observations, with an emphasis on those of protoplanetary disks. These data are still being analyzed and interpreted, so my comments will be preliminary. However, they demonstrate that CanariCam is an outstanding instrument that can provide valuable insight into a variety of astrophysical processes. CanariCam's polarimetric mode is particularly unique, and I will show intriguing science results that may indicate the magnetic-field distribution
in a YSO outflow and in massive disks and their environments. I am presenting these results on behalf of the CanariCam Science Team, many of whom have contributed significantly to the early progress with CanariCam.


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Tuesday April 30, 2013
Dr. Javier Rodríguez Zaurín
IAC

Abstract

Although there is increasing speculation that the evolution of galaxy bulges may be regulated by AGN-induced outflows associated with the growth of the central supermassive black holes, the importance of AGN-induced outflows relative to those driven by starbursts has yet to be established observationally. In this context we have recently presented a study focusing on AGN-induced outflows in a sample of local Seyftert-ULIRGs. Perhaps, our most interesting result is related to the energy that the AGN returns to the galaxy in the form of feedback. We find that the typical mass outflows rates and kinetic powers of the emission line outflows are, in general, less energetically significant than the neutral and molecular outflows in ULIRGs and moreover, than those required today in the majority of the current hydrodynamic simulations that include AGN feedback. However, the uncertainties in the existing measurements are large, and more accurate estimates of the radii, densities and reddening of the outflows are required to put these results on a firmer footing. In this context, we are using HST /ACS+STIS and VLT-Xhsooter observations to accurately estimate sizes, electron densities and reddening to eventually provide the most accurate estimates of the kinetic powers associated with the ionized gas. In this talk I will describe in detail the results of this study focussing on testing the current simulations of hierarchical galaxy evolution.


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Thursday June 21, 2012
Prof. Françoise Combes
Observatoire de Paris, LERMA. France

Abstract

I will review some recent results about the molecular content of galaxies and its dynamics, obtained from CO lines, dense tracers (HCN,HCO+), or the dust continuum emission. New data to constrain the conversion factor XCO will be discussed. The molecular surface density is essential to determine the star formation efficiency in galaxies, and the resolved Kennicutt-Schmidt law will be presented as a function of surface density and galaxy type. Large progress has been made on galaxy at moderate and high redshifts, allowing to interprete the star formation history and star formation efficiency as a function of gas content, or galaxy evolution. In massive galaxies, the gas fraction was higher in the past, and galaxy disks were more unstable and more turbulent. ALMA observations will allow the study of more normal galaxies at high z with higher spatial resolution and sensitivity.


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Thursday January 27, 2011
Prof. Tom Abel
Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, USA

Abstract

This lecture will address recent progress in modeling the emergence of cosmic structure at high redshifts. Also new insights gained from numerical simulations into the processes relevant for star formation are presented. Rapid magnetic field growth in galaxies and the important role of proto-stellar outflows regulating star formation up to pc scales are particularly highlighted.


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