Found 4 talks width keyword astrosiesmology

Video
Thursday February 1, 2018
Dr. Savita Mathur
IAC

Abstract


More than 40 years ago, Skumanich (1972) showed how rotation and magnetic activity decreased with the age of a solar-like star. While this result was based on the study of young cluster stars, later observations  of other clusters, still younger than the Sun, agreed with this “gyrochronology” relationship.

With the high-quality photometric data collected by the Kepler mission, we have the opportunity to test and study the evolution of stellar dynamics to older field stars. While for clusters, the determination of stellar ages is eased by the fact that the stars were born from the same molecular cloud, it gets trickier and less precise for field stars. This is where asteroseismology plays an important role by providing more precise ages than any other classical methods.

In this talk I will mostly focus on asteroseismic targets from solar-like stars to red giants where we could measure surface rotation, core rotation, and magnetic activity. I will show how the photometric data of Kepler is providing key information in the understanding of angular momentum transport in stars and of magnetic activity at different evolutionary stages of a star like the Sun.


Video
Tuesday July 26, 2011
Dr. Katrien Uytterhoeven
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

The Kepler spacecraft is providing photometric time series with micromagnitude precision for thousands of variable stars. The continuous time-series of unprecedented timespan open up the opportunity to study the pulsational variability in much more detail than was previously possible from the ground. We present a first general characterization of the variability of A-F type stars as observed in the Kepler light curves of a sample of 750 candidate variable A-F type stars, and investigate the relation between gamma Doradus, delta Scuti, and hybrid stars. Our results suggest a revision of the current observational instability strips, and imply an investigation of pulsation mechanisms to drive hybrid pulsations.


Video
Thursday June 23, 2011
Dr. Patrick Gaulme
Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale; Université Paris Sud, Paris, France

Abstract

At the end of 2008, on ideas of teams from the Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur (OCA) and IAC, the CoRoT satellite observed the star HD 46375, known to host a non-transiting Saturn-mass exoplanet with a 3.023 day period. HD 46375 is the brightest star with a known close-in planet in the CoRoT accessible field of view. As such, it was targeted by the CoRoT additional program and observed in a CCD normally dedicated to the asteroseismology program, to obtain an ultra-precise photometric lightcurve and detect or place upper limits on the brightness of the planet. In addition, a ground-based support was simultaneously performed with the high-resolution NARVAL spectro-polarimeter to constrain the stellar atmospheric and magnetic properties. In this seminar, I will present the main results, in particular the stellar constrain we obtained thanks to the detection of the oscillation mode signature and the plausible detection of the planetary signal, which, if confirmed with future observations, would be the first detection of phase changes in the visible for a non-transiting planet.


Video
Wednesday May 26, 2010
Dr. Katrien Uytterhoeven
Laboratoire AIM, IRFU/DSM/CEA, Saclay, France

Abstract

Gamma Dor stars (M = 1.2-2.5 M⊙; spectral type A-F) are very interesting from an asteroseismic point of view. They show gravity modes, which are the only modes that provide information on the deep stellar interior. Observationally they are very challenging targets. Typical pulsation periods are of the order of a day and amplitudes are fairly small (below 0.05 mag; 2 km/s), making it extremely difficult to monitor the periodic variations from the ground. The asteroseismic space missions CoRoT and Kepler are providing uninterrupted time-series from space, with unprecedented accuracy, and hence promise a revolution in the study of gamma Dor stars. I will present results of the seismic analysis of CoRoT and Kepler gamma Dor targets, and the associated ground-based support observations, involving many telescopes at different observatories (including La Palma and Izaña).

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