Found 42 talks archived in The Galaxy

matteo_monelli_antonio_milone_121106s
Tuesday November 6, 2012
Dr. Matteo Monelli, Dr. Antonio Milone
IAC

Abstract

The classical idea that globular clusters are the prototypes of simple stellar populations has been revolutionized in the last few years. Multiple sequences of stars have been detected in the colour-magnitude diagram of a number of clusters, mostly thanks to high-precision HST photometry, and the correlation with the chemical properties of different generations of stars has been demonstrated. In this talk, we will first present a summary of the observational picture, and we will then introduce the SUMO project (a SUrvey of Multiple pOpulations). This is a long-term project, lead here at the IAC and aimed at detecting and characterizing multiple populations in a large sample of globular clusters. We will review the scope, the observing and reduction strategy, and the first results. So far, data for more than 30 clusters have been secured, using the wide field imagers available at the 2.2m ESO/MPI and INT telescope, thus covering both hemispheres. We will present a new photometric index which turned out to be very effective in detecting multiple RGBs in nearly all the clusters analyzed so far. The connection with the chemical content of the different populations will be also discussed.


carlos_gonzalez_fernandez_120419s
Thursday April 19, 2012
Dr. Carlos González Fernández
Universidad de Alicante, Spain

Abstract

Abstract: The study of the structure of our Galaxy, particularly its inner disc, has always been hindered by two factors: interstellar extinction dims even the brightest stars at optical wavelengths and the high source density prevents us, as the proverbial trees, to see the big galactic picture. 

With this talk we give a broad introduction of the historical efforts to alleviate these issues in the neverending quest to dig deeper into the Milky Way, followed by a overview of the first results obtained by the VVV-Vista survey, that maps the southern Galactic sky with unprecedent depth and resolution.

ricardo_genova_santos_carlos_lopez_caraballo_111110s
Thursday November 10, 2011
Dr. Ricardo Genova-Santos, Mr. Carlos Lopez Caraballo
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

The anomalous microwave emission (AME) is an additional diffuse foreground component, originated by an emission mechanism in the ISM different from the well-known synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust emissions. It was first discovered at the end of the nineties as a correlated signal between microwave CMB maps and infrared maps tracing the dust emission. Ever since several detections have been found in individual clouds in our Galaxy. This emission is an important contaminant for current and future CMB experiments, and therefore its characterization (both in temperature and in polarization) and understanding is mandatory. So far different theoretical models have been proposed to explain the physical mechanism that give rise to this emission. In this talk we will review these models and will present the current observational status of the AME, with particular emphasis on some recent studies that have been performed by our group in the IAC in the Perseus molecular complex and in the Pleiades reflection nebula.


martin_lopez_corredoira_110517s
Tuesday May 17, 2011
Dr. Martín López Corredoira
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

Milky Way and most spiral galaxies present some features in the outer part of its disk such as S-warping or U-warping, flaring, lopsidedness, truncation/non-truncation and others, both for the stellar and the gas component. In the present talk, I will review some of the galactic dynamics hypotheses which try to explain these features: either in terms of gravitational interaction, magnetic fields, accretion of intergalactic matter or others. The gravitational interaction may be among the different components of the galaxy or between the spiral galaxy and another companion galaxy. The accretion of intergalactic matter may be either into the halo, with a later gravitational interaction between the misaligned halo and the disc, or directly onto the disc. The phenomena of the outer disc in spiral galaxies might be produced by more than a mechanism. Nonetheless, the hypothesis of accretion of intergalactic matter onto the disc presents several advantages over its competitors, since it explains most of the relevant observed features, whereas other hypotheses only explain them partially.


ben_davies_110113s
Thursday January 13, 2011
Dr. Ben Davies
University of Leeds, UK

Abstract

Massive stars dominate the light output of entire galaxies, with luminosities in excess of 105 L⊙. This makes them powerful probes with which to study a range of astrophysical phenomena. In this talk I will review the recent results of our group, in which we have been able to shed new light on the recent star-forming history of our Galaxy, and the nature of supernova progenitors. I will also discuss our latest project, which is to use massive stars as tracers of extra-galactic star-forming histories out to distances of 10 Mpc and beyond.


moha_azimlu_100324s
Wednesday March 24, 2010
Dr. Moha Azimlu
University of Western Ontario, Canada

Abstract

The properties of molecular clouds associated with 10 H II regions were studied using CO observations. We identified 142 dense clumps within our sample and measured and calculated physical properties of the clumps such as size, excitation temperature, line widths, density and mass. We found that our sources are divided into two categories: those that show a size-line width relation ("type I") and those which do not show any relation ("type II"). Type II sources have larger line widths in general. Investigating the relation between the line width and other parameters shows that while the MLTE (Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium mass) increases with ΔV (line width) for both 12CO(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) lines in type I sources, no relation was found for type II sources. No relation between column density and line width was found for either category. We also investigated how the characteristics of the clumps vary with distance from the HII region. We found no relation between mass distribution of the clumps and distance from the ionization front, but a weak decrease of the excitation temperature with increasing distance from the ionized gas. Only the projected distance is measured in our study which is equal or smaller than the true value. Therefore we compared the results by a Monte Carlo simulation of a central heating source and found that for small distances the relation is very scattered, which is consistent with our results. No relation was found between line width and distance from the H II region which probably indicates that the internal dynamics of the clumps is not affected by the ionized gas. Internal sources of turbulence, such as outflows and stellar winds from young proto-stars may have a more important role.

james_j_binney_100318s
Thursday March 18, 2010
Prof. James J. Binney
Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, UK

Abstract

The study of the Milky is expected to have a major impact on our understanding of how galaxies form and evolve. "Near-field cosmology" is being vigorously pursued through a series of major surveys of the Galaxy's stellar content (2-MASS, SDSS, RAVE, Hermes, Apogee, Gaia) that are either in hand or pending. It will be argued that what we want to know is deeply buried in these data and can only be extracted by comparing the surveys with a hierarchy of dynamical models of ever increasing complexity. Work currently being done to build such hierarchical models will be described, and some early results from this work will be summarised.

sergio_simon_090903s
Thursday September 3, 2009
Dr. Sergio Simón
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

The Orion star forming region is an ideal laboratory for many astrophysical studies. In this talk I will present a study of the chemical composition of early B-type stars in the Orion OB1 association. The main ideas I will talk about are: (1) The importance of self-consistent spectroscopic techniques for the abundance analysis in this type of stellar objects; (2) the study of the homogeneity of abundances in stars from the various stellar subgroups in OriOB1; (3) the comparison of O stellar abundances with recent Solar determinations; (4) the comparison of stellar abundances with those resulting from the analysis of the emission line spectra of the Orion nebula (M42); (5) the study of the oxygen depletion onto dust grains in the Orion nebula. La región de formación estelar de Orión es una laboratorio perfecto para muchos tipos de estudios en astrofísica. En esta charla me centraré en el estudio de abundancias de las estrellas de tipo B temprano presentes en la asociación OriOB1. Las principales ideas que presentaré son: (1) La importancia de los análisis espectroscópicos detallados en la determinación de abundancias en estrellas de tipo B temprano; (2) el estudio de la homogeneidad química de los distintos subgrupos estelares que componen OriOB1; (3) la comparación de la abundancias estelares de oxígeno con determinaciones recientes en el Sol; (4) La comparación de abundancias estelares con aquellas obtenidas a partir de análisis del espectro de M42, la nebulosa de Orion; (5) el estudio de la depleción de oxígeno en granos de polvo en la nebulosa de Orión.

santi_cassisi_090421s
Tuesday April 21, 2009
Dr. Santi Cassisi
INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Teramo, Italy

Abstract

The last few years have witnessed a growing amount of empirical evidence pointing to the existence of multiple stellar populations in some Galactic globular clusters. It is also becoming more and more clear that clusters, hosting multiple stellar populations, do share some common properties, but also differ from each other in various aspects. In this talk, I will review the recent results concerning the presence of multiple stellar populations in stellar clusters, emphasizing the (different) properties of the subpopulations in the various clusters, and how they have been interpreted so far. I will discuss also the global characteristics of "peculiar" clusters - hosting multiple populations - from different points of view, and compare them with "normal" clusters, to try and shed some light on their nature and origin.

antonio_marin_franch_081027s
Monday October 27, 2008
Dr. Antonio Marín-Franch
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Spain

Abstract

Based on observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), I will present accurate relative ages for a sample of 64 Galactic globular clusters. This Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Treasury program has been designed to provide a new large, deep and homogeneous photometric database. Relative ages have been obtained using a main sequence fitting procedure between clusters in the sample. Relative ages are determined with an accuracy from 2% to 7%. It has been proved that derived ages are independent of the assumed theoretical models. The existence of two well defined Galactic globular cluster groups is found. A group of old globular clusters with an age dispersion of 6% and showing no age-metallicity relation, and, on the other hand, a younger group showing a clear age-metallicity relation similar to that found in the globular clusters associated to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. Roughly 1/3 of the clusters belong to the younger group. Considering these new results, it is very tempting to suggest a Milky Way's halo formation scenario in which two differentiated phases took place. A very fast collapse, where the old and coeval globular clusters where formed, followed by accretions of Milky Way's satellite galaxies.