Found 52 talks archived in Computing

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Tuesday May 26, 2020
Dr. Mohammad Akhlaghi, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Joseph Putko
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias

Abstract

 

Gnuastro is an official GNU package that is currently maintained at the IAC. It is a large collection of programs to enable easy, robust, fast and efficient data analysis directly on the command-line. For example it can perform arithmetic operations on image pixels or table columns/rows without having to write programs, visualize FITS images as JPG or PDF, convolve an image with a given kernel or matching of kernels, perform cosmological calculations, crop parts of large images (possibly in multiple files), manipulate FITS extensions and keywords, and perform statistical operations. In addition, it contains programs to make catalogs from detection maps, add noise, make mock profiles with a variety of radial functions using monte-carlo integration for their centers, match catalogs, and detect objects in an image among many other operations. Gnuastro is written to comply fully with the GNU coding standards and integrates well with all Unix-like operating systems. This enables astronomers to expect a fully familiar experience in the building, installing and command-line user interaction that they have seen in all the other GNU software that they use (core components in many Unix-like/POSIX operating systems). In this SMACK, we will introduce Gnuastro and demonstrate a selection of its commonly used features. Relevant links are as follows. Lecture-notes: in https://gitlab.com/makhlaghi/smack-talks-iac/-/blob/master/smack-3-gnuastro.md, Gnuastro's main webpage: https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro, Gnuastro documentation: https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual, Gnuastro tutorials: https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Tutorials.html

 

Zoom link https://rediris.zoom.us/j/94454701469


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Tuesday May 5, 2020
Dr. Mohammad Akhlaghi, Dr. Raul Infante-Sainz and Joseph Putko
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias

Abstract

The shell (or command-line) is the most commonly used (for advanced operations) interface to Unix-like operating systems.
In this session we'll introduce some of the most commonly used command-line/shell features and how they may be used in a hypothetical research project, using real astronomical data sets.
The session plan (with a listing of used commands and short explanation) is available here: https://gitlab.com/makhlaghi/smack-talks-iac/-/blob/master/smack-2-shell.md

 

https://rediris.zoom.us/j/98301657954


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Tuesday April 7, 2020
Dr. Mohammad Akhlaghi, Dr. Carlos Allende Prieto
IAC

Abstract

Short Meetings on Astro Computing Knowledge (SMACK) are a series of talks, or more appropriately 'live demonstrations', presented in the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), targeting graduate students and researchers.  The main aim of the talks is to demonstrate the use and benefits of basic software tools that are commonly required for astronomical research. These talks will be showcasted at IAC Talks and recorded for easy future reference by the community.

The 1st SMACK is a brief introduction to the linux shell and the basic tools that come with it. We'll assume no previous knowledge and include a brief history of the POSIX standard.

 

 


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Friday November 9, 2018
Prof. Michael Biehl
Johann Bernoulli Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Groningen

Abstract

Series: XXX Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Big Data in Astronomy
Topic: Supervised learning: classification and regression
Lecture 4


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Thursday November 8, 2018
Prof. Michael Biehl
Johann Bernoulli Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Groningen

Abstract

Series: XXX Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Big Data in Astronomy
Topic: Supervised learning: classification and regression
Lecture 3


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Thursday November 8, 2018
Prof. Marc Huertas-Company
Université Paris-Diderot - Observatoire de Paris

Abstract

Series: XXX Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Big Data in Astronomy
Topic: Deep learning
Lecture 4


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Thursday November 8, 2018
Prof. Mario Juric
University of Washington

Abstract

Series: XXX Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Big Data in Astronomy
Topic: Data challenges and solutions in forthcoming surveys
Lecture 4


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Thursday November 8, 2018
Prof. George Djorgovski
Caltech, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy

Abstract

Series: XXX Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Big Data in Astronomy
Topic: General overview on the use of machine learning techniques in astronomy
Lecture 4


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Wednesday November 7, 2018
Mrs. Dalya Baron
School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University

Abstract

Series: XXX Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Big Data in Astronomy
Topic: Machine learning methods for non-supervised classification and dimension reduction techniques
Lecture 4


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Wednesday November 7, 2018
Prof. Mario Juric
University of Washington

Abstract

Series: XXX Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics: Big Data in Astronomy
Topic: Data challenges and solutions in forthcoming surveys
Lecture 3