Found 25 talks width keyword SDSS

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Tuesday March 28, 2023
University of St. Andrew

Abstract

Galaxies and the dark matter halos in which they reside are intrinsically connected. That relationship holds information about key processes in galaxy and structure formation. In this talk, I will consider how the galaxy-halo connection depends on position within the cosmic web - the familiar decomposition of large-scale structure in filaments, knots and voids. Simulations demonstrate the various ways in which the cosmic web modulates the growth and dynamics of halos. The extent to which the cosmic web impacts on galaxies is more difficult to establish. For example, galaxies might be sensitive only to the evolution of the host halo, in which case any effect of the cosmic web on galaxies is secondary, and can be inferred from the halo's history. There is evidence, however - from simulations and observations - that the cosmic web also impacts on the evolution of galaxies via the effect it has on the broader gas ecosystem in which they are embedded, as well as through "pre-processing" effects on group scale. So, how should we think of the cosmic web in its role as a transformative agent of galaxies? And what physical processes can we convincingly constrain from observations and simulations? In this talk I highlight recent work that addresses these questions.


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Thursday March 2, 2023
UNAM

Abstract

 

Early-type galaxies: instructions to build them through mergers
Massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) are "red and dead" systems mainly composed of old and metal-rich stellar populations. In a cosmological context, present-day ETGs are believed to be the remnants of a complex stellar mass assembly history marked by several mergers, which are the consequence of the underlying hierarchical assembly of their host dark matter halos. In this talk, I will deal mainly with the merger-driven evolution of ETGs. Firstly, I will illustrate a comparison between observed ETGs from the MaNGA survey and simulated galaxies from the IllustrisTNG cosmological simulation suite. The aim of this study is to provide an interpretative scenario of the stellar mass assembly history of observed present-day ETGs, comparing the radial distributions of their stellar properties with those of simulated galaxies, in which it is possible to disentangle the contribution of stars formed in situ (i.e. within the main progenitor galaxy) and stars formed ex situ (i.e. in other galaxies) and then accreted through mergers. Then, I will describe how the scaling relation between the stellar mass and stellar velocity dispersion in ETGs evolves across cosmic time. Specifically, by extending the results of Cannnarozzo, Sonnenfeld & Nipoti (2020), I model the aforementioned relation through a Bayesian hierarchical approach, considering ETGs with log(M∗/M⊙) > 9 over the redshift range 0 ≲ z ≲ 4. Together with a new characterisation of the relation, I reconstruct the back-in-time evolutionary pathways of individual ETGs on the stellar mass-velocity dispersion plane to answer the question “how did high-redshift ETGs assemble through cosmic time to reach the functional form of the relation in the present-day Universe?“.
After the main topic, if time permits, I would like to spend a few minutes presenting another extra content (below you can find the title and a brief abstract of this further content). Feel free to include it or not in the announcement mail.
EXTRA - Inferring the Dark Matter halo mass in galaxies from other observables with Machine Learning
In the context of the galaxy-halo connection, it is widely known that the Dark Matter (DM) halos show correlations with some physical properties of the hosted galaxy: the most well-known relation is the so-called Stellar-to-Halo-Mass Relation. However, we know that there are several other empirical relations among galaxy properties, involving, for example, the stellar mass, the gas and stellar metallicities, the black hole mass, etc. Given the complexity of the problem and the high number of galaxy properties that might be related to DM halos, the study of the galaxy-halo connection can be approached by relying on machine learning techniques to shed light on this intricate network of relations. With the aim of inferring the DM halo mass and then finding a unique functional form able to link the halo mass to other observables in real galaxies, I rely on the state-of-the-art Explainable Boosting Machine, a novel implementation of generalised additive models with pairwise interactions, training a model on the IllustrisTNG simulation suite at different redshift.

 

 

 

Youtube933518


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Thursday December 15, 2022
Univ. Genève

Abstract

In this talk, I will present recent results on a new sample of extremely UV-luminous star-forming galaxies at z=2-4 discovered within the 9000deg^2-wide Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey database of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These puzzling sources show apparent magnitudes rivaling those of bright QSOs, but without any hint of AGN activity or being magnified by gravitational lensing. Instead, these sources are characterized by very young stellar populations (~ 10 Myr) and compact morphologies. The two highest-redshift sources in our sample show very high Lyman continuum (LyC, with >13.6 eV) escape fractions, up to fesc(LyC)~90%, being the most powerful ionizing sources identified so far among the star-forming galaxy population, both in terms of the intrinsic LyC photon production rate and escape. With SFRs~1000 Msun/yr, but almost un-obscured, and specific star formation sSFR >50-100 Gyr^-1, these sources are very efficient star-forming galaxies, possibly representing a short-lived phase in the evolution of massive and compact galaxies. I will highlight some unique properties observed in these sources including LyC emission, complex Lyman-alpha profiles, strong wind lines, SEDs, among others. Finally, I discuss the properties of these UV-bright sources in the broad context of galaxy formation and evolution, and possible implications to cosmic reionization.


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Thursday December 2, 2021
Kavli Cambridge

Abstract

In the local universe most of the stellar mass is in passive galaxies, where star formation is
absent or at very low levels. Understanding what are the mechanisms that have been
responsible for quenching star formation in galaxies, and transforming them into passive,
quiescent systems, is one of the main observational and theoretical challenges of extragalactic
astrophysics. I will give a brief overview of the several possible quenching causes and physical
processes that have been proposed so far, ranging from feedback from black hole accretion and
starburst activity, to effects associated with the large scale environment in which galaxies live.
Although most of these mechanisms and causes play a role in different classes of galaxies and
at different epochs, multi-band observations are providing growing evidences that just a few of
them play the key, dominant role.
I will conclude by providing prospects for further investigating these aspects and tackling open
questions with the next generation of observing facilities.


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Thursday November 4, 2021
DIPC

Abstract

 

On the LCDM cosmology, dark matter collapses into virialised objects called haloes. The abundance and distribution of these haloes are a direct consequence of the cosmology of the Universe. By constraining the dark matter halo clustering, we could also constraint the cosmology from our Universe. Since dark matter haloes can not be observed, we need to use galaxies to trace them.

In this talk, I will present a new method that we develop capable of constraining cosmological information from the redshift space galaxy clustering.  We use the scaling of cosmological simulations and the SubHalo Abundance Matching extended (SHAMe) empirical model to produce realistic galaxy clustering measurements over a wide range of cosmologies. We generate more than 500,000 clustering measurements at different cosmological and SHAMe parameters to build an emulator capable of reproducing the projected correlation function, monopole and quadrupole of the galaxies. We run an MCMC using this emulator to constrain the cosmology of the TNG300 hydrodynamic simulation. We correctly predicted the cosmology of the TNG300 simulation constraining sigma8 between [0.75,0.83] and Omega matter h^2 between [0.127,0.162]. The best constraints are obtained when including scales below 2 Mpc/h and when combining all different clustering statistics. We conclude that our approach can be used to constrain cosmological and galaxy formation parameters from the galaxy clustering of galaxy surveys.

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Tuesday May 25, 2021
IFIC

Abstract

In this talk, we shall review the impact of the neutrino properties on the different cosmological observables. We shall also present the latest cosmological constraints on the neutrino masses and on the effective number of relativistic species. Special attention would be devoted to the role of neutrinos in solving the present cosmological tensions.


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Thursday December 12, 2019
Ohio State university

Abstract

Time-domain space missions have revolutionized our understanding of stellar physics and stellar populations. Virtually all evolved stars can be detected as oscillators in missions such as Kepler, K2, TESS and PLATO.  Asteroseismology, or the study of stellar oscillations, can be combined with spectroscopy to infer masses, radii and ages for very large samples of stars.  This asteroseismic data can also be used to train machine learning tools to infer ages for even larger stellar population studies, sampling a large fraction of the volume of the Milky Way galaxy. In this talk I demonstrate that asteroseismic radii are in excellent agreement with those inferred using Gaia and spectroscopic data; this demonstrates that the current asteroseismic data is precise and accurate at the 1-2% level.  Major new catalogs for Kepler and K2 data are nearing completion, and I present initial results from both. We find unexpected age patterns in stars though to be chemically old, illustrating the power of age information for Galactic archeology.  Prospects for future progress in the TESS era will also be discussed.


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Thursday June 13, 2019
IAC

Abstract

Although the name 'fundamental metallicity relation' (FMR) may sound a bit bombastic, it really represents a fundamental relation in the sense of revealing a fundamental process in galaxy formation. Numerical simulations predict that accretion of cosmic web gas feeds star formation in star-forming galaxies. However, this solid theoretical prediction has been extremely elusive to confirm. The FMR, i.e., the fact that galaxies of the same stellar mass but larger star formation rate (SFR) tend to have smaller gas-phase metallicity (Zg), is one of the best observational supports available yet. The talk will introduce the FMR and then present recent results of our group showing how the FMR emerges from a local anti-correlation between SFR and Zg existing in the disks of galaxies. Thus, understanding the FMR is equivalent to understanding why active star-forming regions tend to have low relative metallicity. The existence of the local anti-correlation SFR-vs-Zg is found by Sanchez-Menguiano+19 ApJ  and Sanchez Almeida+18 MNRAS, whereas the equivalence between local and global laws is in Sanchez Almeida & Sanchez-Menguiano 19 ApJL.


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Tuesday April 9, 2019
Univ. of Washington, Seattle

Abstract

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most successful and prolific projects in the history of Astronomy.
In its fifth iteration SDSS-V (2020-2025) will provide a more comprehensive, global picture of the local universe by
studying the interplay between galactic genesis, stellar and black hole processes, and the physics of the ISM. I will
review the main science goals of the project, the exciting new hardware being implemented (robot fibre positioner,
large IFU systems), and the operational challenges. As in its previous incarnations, SDSS-V remains committed to
providing high-quality data products for the astronomical and educational communities. I will discuss some of the
new ideas being developed for SDSS-V with regards to data reduction, release, archival, and visualisation.


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Thursday March 14, 2019
Fundacion Jesus Serra

Abstract

The SDSS Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution 
Experiment (APOGEE) has
collected high resolution near-IR spectra of several hundred thousand stars
across the Milky Way. I'll describe some observational results about the
spatial variation of chemical abundances as a function of Galactocentric
radius and distance from the midplane, discussing mean abundances, 
metallicity
distribution function, and the variation of abundance ratios of multiple
elements. Additional information related to stellar ages can be obtained
from [C/N] for red giant stars. Several lines of evidence suggest that 
radial
migration has had a significant impact on the Galactic disk. The 
observed patterns of
abundance ratios may provide observational constraints on 
nucleosynthetic yields.


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