Found 93 talks archived in Cosmology

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Tuesday September 26, 2023
Dr. Mike Peel
Imperial College London

Abstract

Simons Observatory (SO) is a new Cosmic Microwave Background telescope currently under construction in the Atacama Desert, close to ALMA and other recent CMB telescopes. It will have six small aperture (42cm) telescopes (SATs), and one large aperture (6m) telescope (LAT), observing at 30-280GHz (1-10mm) using transition edge sensors (TES) and kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs). As well as observing the polarisation of the CMB to unprecedented sensitivity, the LAT will perform a constant survey at higher angular resolution, enabling the systematic detection of transient sources in the submm, with large overlap of optical surveys such as LSST, DESI and DES. As well as giving an overview of SO, I summarise the types of transient sources that are expected to be seen by SO, including flaring stars, quasars, asteroids, and man-made satellites.


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Tuesday March 28, 2023
Drs. Rita Tojeiro
University of St. Andrew

Abstract

Galaxies and the dark matter halos in which they reside are intrinsically connected. That relationship holds information about key processes in galaxy and structure formation. In this talk, I will consider how the galaxy-halo connection depends on position within the cosmic web - the familiar decomposition of large-scale structure in filaments, knots and voids. Simulations demonstrate the various ways in which the cosmic web modulates the growth and dynamics of halos. The extent to which the cosmic web impacts on galaxies is more difficult to establish. For example, galaxies might be sensitive only to the evolution of the host halo, in which case any effect of the cosmic web on galaxies is secondary, and can be inferred from the halo's history. There is evidence, however - from simulations and observations - that the cosmic web also impacts on the evolution of galaxies via the effect it has on the broader gas ecosystem in which they are embedded, as well as through "pre-processing" effects on group scale. So, how should we think of the cosmic web in its role as a transformative agent of galaxies? And what physical processes can we convincingly constrain from observations and simulations? In this talk I highlight recent work that addresses these questions.


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Thursday March 23, 2023
Dr. Lorenzo Pizzuti
CEICO, Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences

Abstract

I present the recent results obtained using the updated version of MG-MAMPOSSt, a code that constrains modified gravity (MG) models viable at cosmological scales using determination of galaxy cluster mass profiles with kinematics and lensing analyses. I will discuss limitations and future developments of this method in view of upcoming imaging and spectroscopic surveys, as well as the possibilities of including X-ray data to break degeneracy among model parameters. Finally I will show preliminary results about the constraints that can be obtained on the inner slope of dark matter profiles when adding the velocity dispersion of the Brightest Central Galaxy (BCG) in the dataset of MG-MAMPOSSt.


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Friday January 27, 2023
Prof. Belén Gavela
IFT/UAM

Abstract

 

 After introducing the concepts of axions and axion-like-particles (ALPs) and their signals, true axions which can be either much heavier or much
lighter than the canonical axion will be discussed. The implications for dark matter, neutron stars and gravitational waves searches will  also be addressed.

 

 


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Thursday January 19, 2023
Prof. José Alberto Rubiño-Martín
IAC

Abstract

I will review the status of the QUIJOTE (Q-U-I JOint TEnerife) experiment, a project led from the IAC with the aim of characterising the polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and other galactic or extragalactic physical processes that emit in microwaves in the frequency range 10-42GHz, and at large angular scales (1 degree resolution). QUIJOTE consists of two telescopes and three instruments operating from the Teide Observatory, and started operations about 10 years ago, in November 2012.

I will discuss the status of the project, and I will present the latest scientific results associated with the wide survey carried out with the first QUIJOTE instrument (MFI) at 11, 13, 17 and 19GHz, covering approximately 29000 deg$^2$ with polarisation sensitivities in the range of 35-40 $\mu$K/deg. These MFI maps provide the most accurate description we have of the polarization of the emission of the Milky Way in the microwave range, in a frequency domain previously unexplored by other experiments. These maps provide a unique view of the Galactic
magnetic field as traced by the synchrotron emission. These results have been presented in an initial series of 6 scientific articles published on January 12th, 2023.

Finally, I will describe the prospects for future CMB observations from the Teide Observatory.


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Tuesday September 13, 2022
Dr. Martín López Corredoira
IAC

Abstract

Cosmological observations (redshifts, cosmic microwave background radiation, abundance of light elements, formation and evolution of galaxies, large-scale structure) find explanations within the standard Lambda-CDM model, although many times after a number of ad hoc corrections. Nevertheless, the expression ‘crisis in cosmology’ stubbornly reverberates in the scientific literature: the higher the precision with which the standard cosmological model tries to fit the data, the greater the number of tensions that arise. Moreover, there are alternative explanations for most of the observations. Therefore, cosmological hypotheses should be very cautiously proposed and even more cautiously received.

There are also sociological and philosophical arguments to support this scepticism. Only the standard model is considered by most professional cosmologists, while the challenges of the most fundamental ideas of modern cosmology are usually neglected. Funding, research positions, prestige, telescope time, publication in top journals, citations, conferences, and other resources are dedicated almost exclusively to standard cosmology. Moreover, religious, philosophical, economic, and political ideologies in a world dominated by anglophone culture also influence the contents of cosmological ideas.


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Tuesday May 10, 2022
Dr. Alessia Ritacco
IAS/OAC

Abstract

The search for the primordial B-modes polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation,
carrying the signature of the primordial gravitational waves from the inflation epoch, motivated a significant
technological progress enabling the next generation of CMB instruments (e.g. CMB-S4, LiteBIRD)
to reach an unprecedented sensitivity. However, such a challenging detection demands a very high control
of the instrumental systematics and CMB foreground emissions.
Among those, the galactic dust polarized emission spectral dependence, not yet fully
characterized, could leave a high level of uncertainty in the cosmological polarization data
producing an ambiguous detection of the CMB B-modes.
Characterizing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) spatial variations became one of
the most critical issues in the quest for primordial B-modes.
In the work that I will present we have used the release of the Planck satellite HFI data
obtained with the software Sroll2 (Delouis+2019, A&A 629, A38), in order to characterize
and compare the SEDs for polarization and total intensity.
The mean SEDs for dust polarization and total intensity from 353 to 100 GHz are confirmed
to be remarkably close. However, the data show evidence for spatial variations of the
polarization SED. These variations are correlated with variations of dust temperature
measured on total intensity data but the correlation is tight only in the Galactic plane.
At higher latitudes, by considering 90% of useful sky fraction and less, the amplitude of the dust
emission residuals in polarization suggests that an additional contribution, coming from
variations of the polarization angle, becomes dominant. Current models, which extrapolate
the SED spatial variations from total intensity to polarization, would be therefore grossly
simplifying and underestimating the foreground signal to CMB polarization.



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Thursday February 10, 2022
Dr. Marcos Pellejero
DIPC

Abstract

A key problem that we are facing in cosmology nowadays is that we cannot make accurate predictions with our current theoretical models. We have all of the pieces of the standard model but it doesn't have an analytical solution. The only way to have accurate predictions is to run a cosmological simulation. Then, why not use these simulations as the theory model? Well, for one main reason, if we want to explore the full parameter space comprised in the standard model, we need thousands of such simulations, and they are terribly computationally expensive. We wouldn't be able to do it in years! In this talk, I will tell you how in the last few years we have come up with a way to circumvent this problem.


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Thursday November 4, 2021
Dr. Sergio Contreras
DIPC

Abstract

 

On the LCDM cosmology, dark matter collapses into virialised objects called haloes. The abundance and distribution of these haloes are a direct consequence of the cosmology of the Universe. By constraining the dark matter halo clustering, we could also constraint the cosmology from our Universe. Since dark matter haloes can not be observed, we need to use galaxies to trace them.

In this talk, I will present a new method that we develop capable of constraining cosmological information from the redshift space galaxy clustering.  We use the scaling of cosmological simulations and the SubHalo Abundance Matching extended (SHAMe) empirical model to produce realistic galaxy clustering measurements over a wide range of cosmologies. We generate more than 500,000 clustering measurements at different cosmological and SHAMe parameters to build an emulator capable of reproducing the projected correlation function, monopole and quadrupole of the galaxies. We run an MCMC using this emulator to constrain the cosmology of the TNG300 hydrodynamic simulation. We correctly predicted the cosmology of the TNG300 simulation constraining sigma8 between [0.75,0.83] and Omega matter h^2 between [0.127,0.162]. The best constraints are obtained when including scales below 2 Mpc/h and when combining all different clustering statistics. We conclude that our approach can be used to constrain cosmological and galaxy formation parameters from the galaxy clustering of galaxy surveys.

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Tuesday October 19, 2021
Dr. Alberto Dominguez
UCM

Abstract

The light emitted by all galaxies across the history of the Universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL), the diffuse cosmic radiation field at ultraviolet, optical, and infrared wavelengths. The EBL is a source of opacity for very high energy gamma rays via pair production, leaving a characteristic attenuation imprint in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources. In this seminar, I will report on new measurements of the EBL using gamma-ray data from both the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. These unprecedented measurements have allowed us to derive the cosmic star-formation history, the number density of faint galaxies during the re-ionization epoch, and also the expansion rate of the Universe and its matter content. These results demonstrate that gamma-ray astrophysics has matured to the point of providing competitive measurements of cosmic properties previously restricted to techniques used by more traditional astronomy.



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